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    #1

    checking of a few sentences

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to share with me your opinion concerning the feasibility of the following sentences?

    The fault lies with you, not with me.

    I am not in fault.

    Who is in fault?

    Whose fault is it?

    We are party in fault.

    It was not my fault that he was late.

    We were all fault.

    She is fastidious to a fault.

    Your essay contains many faults in grammar.

    There is your fault.

    We have to find fault with him.

    Every man has his faults.

    A fault confessed is half redressed.

    Faults are thick when love is thin.

    She loves me in spite of all my faults.

    Her only fault is excessive shyness.

    There is a fault in the electrical system.

    I have no fault to find with your work.

    Whose fault is it that we are late?

    She overlook my fault.

    There is an essential fault of the Pythagorean theory.

    I have to acknowledge my faults.

    He is generous to a fault.

    It is his great fault.

    fault (n) = flaw, defect, imperfection; vice; slip, error, mistake

    Consequently, his final decision cannot be faulted.

    The Americanisms with which we are faulted.

    It was difficult to fault her performance.

    I fault Jane for her dishonor.

    I fault myself for not doing it.

    fault (v) = blame, censure, find fault with

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  1. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: checking of a few sentences

    Isn't it, I'm not at fault?

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    #3

    Re: checking of a few sentences

    Hi Soup,

    Here are my previous wrong ideas of connotations of the expressions “in fault” and “at fault”:

    in fault = guilty, culpable

    Who is in fault? = Who is guilty?

    I am in fault. = I am to blame. = The fault lies with me.

    at fault = mixed-up, confused, perplexed, confounded,

    I am at fault. = I am in a maze.

    My memory was at fault.

    Thanks to your implication I know at the present time doubtless the truth “at fault” = “in the wrong”.

    at fault = responsible for a mistake, trouble, or failure; deserving blame

    in the wrong = mistaken, to blame

    The driver who didn't stop at the red light was at fault in the accident.

    When the engine would not start, the mechanic looked at all the parts to find what was at fault.

    In attacking a smaller boy, Jack was plainly in the wrong.

    Mary was in the wrong to drink from a finger bowl.

    Since he had put pennies behind the fuses, Bill was in the wrong when fire broke out.

    Thank you again for your subtlety. I really adore the subtlety of the distinction you drew.

    Thank you again for your refinement.

    Regards.

    V.

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: checking of a few sentences

    You're most welcome, vil, but you've lost me. What was it that you wanted me to help you with? In my opinion 'in fault' is awkward.

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    #5

    Re: checking of a few sentences

    Hi Soup,

    I agree 100% with you. Sure enough "in fault" is awkward. There are no two ways about it. It was mentioned pretty clear in my last post above already.

    Probably my writing is not so expressive as it should be.

    Please, excuse my imperfection.

    Regards,

    V.

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