Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan

    • Join Date: Sep 2008
    • Posts: 205
    #1

    over there /there

    Hello, teachers:
    I am wondering what's the difference between "over there" and "there."
    May I have your clarification?
    Thanks a lot!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 907
    #2

    Re: over there /there

    Dear WUKEN:

    Quote Originally Posted by WUKEN View Post
    Hello, teachers:
    I am wondering what's the difference between "over there" and "there."
    May I have your clarification?
    Thanks a lot!
    'Over there' usually implies that whatever is 'over there' is at some (widely variable) distance.

    'Where did you leave the car?'
    'Over there by the trees.'

    Of course, the reply could just as easily be, 'There by the trees,' with very little change in meaning, so there are also elements of style and habit.

    I hope this is helpful,

    Petra

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan

    • Join Date: Sep 2008
    • Posts: 205
    #3

    Re: over there /there

    I see!
    Thanks a lot! Petra !

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2009
    • Posts: 48
    #4

    Re: over there /there

    In a phrase, none at all semantically.

    "I am over there" is as good as "I am there" or "I am up there", "I am down there".

    Of course, there is the matter of idiom and the Anglophone innate feeling for prepostions that drives Francophones up the wall.

    But siding with the Francophones, English users do tend to use a lot of redundancy unnecessarily (whoops - pardon my redundancy!).

    EG

    I might ask someone,
    "Print this document off for me" when
    "Print this document for me" (no off) would be sufficient.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 191
    #5

    Re: over there /there

    "Print this document off for me"

    is a very poor way of saying, "Print off this document for me"

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 1,517
    #6

    Re: over there /there

    Quote Originally Posted by Excalibur View Post
    "Print this document off for me"

    is a very poor way of saying, "Print off this document for me"
    Anyway one could leave the "off" out, which is the point.

    Does anyone know an example of an expression in which only "over there" could be used, ruling out "there"? Or vice-versa?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2009
    • Posts: 48
    #7

    Re: over there /there

    "Print off this document for me"

    and

    "
    Print this document off for me"

    are BOTH very poor ways of saying:

    "
    Print this document for me"

    What is the diffeence between
    "Print off this document for me" and "Print this document off for me", please?

    Switch this light off.
    Switch off this light.

    C'est pareil sans aucune difference!

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] It is /there is no wonder that--
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-Jul-2009, 18:07
  2. in this photo are /there are
    By ripley in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 14-Dec-2008, 11:33
  3. there is /there are
    By zoja in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-Apr-2008, 12:37

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •