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    #1

    when do i use to, from, in, and on.

    Probaly not a simple qeustion, but i hope it is? When do i use the term on, in, to, and from. I am always getting them mixed up.

    If you have an idea or maybe a link about the subject.
    thank you


    As an example.

    "I look forward to hearing from you ".

    "I look forward from hearing from you ".

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: when do i use to, from, in, and on.

    Quote Originally Posted by hansolo View Post
    Probaly not a simple qeustion, but i hope it is? When do i use the term on, in, to, and from. I am always getting them mixed up.

    If you have an idea or maybe a link about the subject.
    thank you


    As an example.

    "I look forward to hearing from you ".

    "I look forward from hearing from you ".
    It's not a simple question I'm afraid, have a look at the tests on UE they could help you a lot, here's one for you:

    Log In - UsingEnglish.com

    In your example it's "...to hearing from you."

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    #3

    Re: when do i use to, from, in, and on.

    The little words cause the most confusion. I try to speak Spanish, and find the same problem with the two- and three-letter words!

    TO generally looks forward in time and space
    FROM generally looks backward, and also speaks of origins.
    ON suggests being above
    IN suggests being within

    Of course there are confusions and overlaps. For example, you can be "on time" or "in time" for an event. Subtle differences.

    In your sentence above, remember that the "to" goes with the "looking forward to" not with "hearing". As you are looking into the future, you are looking foward TO something.

    You are looking forward to hearing FROM someone - in this case the FROM refers to the origin of the event. SOMEONE is making the noise of letting you hear them, they are the origin. Think of origins as something that happened in the past, and you'll remember to use FROM in this sense as well (even if the event you ware looking forward TO, will happen in the future).

    I am going TO the store (a forward direction) and will get from bread FROM there (the bread originates at the store).

    I am coming FROM the store (you started at the store, it was the origin of your walk) and am bringing some bread TO my home. (the bread is moving forward).

    I brought bread FROM the store TO my home.

    Now, to ON and IN.

    That bread, remember it? You brought it IN (or INTO) the house - it now is enclosed by a house. But you put it ON the table. The table is IN the house, and it stands ON the floor.

    Do you know the word "interior"? Big hint there: INterior.

    Do you know any song titles with IN or ON in them. I can think of "On Top of Old Smokey" right now - Old Smoky is a mountain, and the song speaks of being at the peak of the mountain, not in some cave within it. If you can find a song title, perhaps it will help you associate the difference between IN and ON. "I'm falling IN love again" - you are surrounded by love, not sitting on it.

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    #4

    Re: when do i use to, from, in, and on.

    Thank you guys, i think i have better idea now. I scored a reasonable score on the test, however; the test does not help when the subject matter is more complicated.

    The sentences below are what i can understand.
    I understand , i sat on a mountain.
    I swam in the sea .
    I placed a book on a table


    This what i am unsure about . When the subject matter ,is ambigous

    "I hope that, on consideration of my"

    The word "consideration" is not something you can touch or see .
    so im unsure whether to use on or in .This is a regular problem when i am writing.

    Cheers

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    #5

    Re: when do i use to, from, in, and on.

    I would say, at first glance, that "consideration" is a concept, something that envelops or surrounds the subject. So you speak of "in" consideration.

    But it all falls apart when you realize you could easily substitute "upon" - "upon consideration of..."

    In fact, although one may be slightly more appropriate than the other in these ambiguous situations, you'll find that either works and is understood.

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    #6

    Re: when do i use to, from, in, and on.

    You mention concept , does concept mean an idea and also an abstract object .
    An abstract object , is this something that cant be seen or touched.

    It probaly doesn't matter! i will just rememeber either is appropriate to use.

    thank you

    __________________________________________________ _________
    I hope that, on consideration of my letter'.
    __________________________________________________ ___________

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