Results 1 to 3 of 3

    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 8
    #1

    Sentence Construction

    What is the difference between the following two sentences:

    1) Declining values for farm equipment and land, the collateral against which farmers borrow to get through the harvest season, are going to force many lenders to tighten or deny credit this spring.

    2) Declining values for farm equipment and land, the collateral which farmers borrow against to get through the harvest season, are going to force many lenders to tighten or deny credit this spring.

    My guess they both mean the same; however, "the collateral against which farmers borrow" sounds awkward to me, yet it seems to be grammatically correct. Can someone help me understand the kind of sentence construction, specifically the part that's mentioned, for sentence #1?

    Thanks in advance!


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 4
    #2

    Re: Sentence Construction

    Quote Originally Posted by metallicfacez View Post
    What is the difference between the following two sentences:

    1) Declining values for farm equipment and land, the collateral against which farmers borrow to get through the harvest season, are going to force many lenders to tighten or deny credit this spring.

    2) Declining values for farm equipment and land, the collateral which farmers borrow against to get through the harvest season, are going to force many lenders to tighten or deny credit this spring.

    My guess they both mean the same; however, "the collateral against which farmers borrow" sounds awkward to me, yet it seems to be grammatically correct. Can someone help me understand the kind of sentence construction, specifically the part that's mentioned, for sentence #1?

    Thanks in advance!
    I'm not entirely certain of the answer here, but I believe "borrow against" is a single expression (maybe an idiom) that shouldn't be split. However, I must say that in languages predominantly Latin, the form "against which... borrow" is in fact the correct form, so this may actually be correct considering much of the English grammar is similar or equal to that of Latin languages.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #3

    Re: Sentence Construction

    They are both correct, but some people remember being taught a "rule" (that is without foundation) about not ending a sentence with a preposition. These people would not write "Collateral is what you borrow money against." They would write something awkward, like "Collateral is that which against you borrow money." (You can see with this alleged rule is ridiculous, can't you?)

    This prohibition for some people extends to embedded clauses, so that's why you'll see things like "against which they borrow."

    Go with what reads more smoothly to you.

Similar Threads

  1. What is a PRO-Infinitive construction?
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 30-Jun-2008, 00:44
  2. Sentence construction
    By Olawale Oriade in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-May-2008, 11:46
  3. How many sentence structure there ?
    By callonghouse in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Aug-2006, 17:43
  4. Attributive Clause - China Needs Your Help
    By ChinaDavid in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-Jan-2005, 16:56
  5. grammar
    By jiang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 17-Dec-2003, 20:02

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •