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    #1

    the word

    The word means authority, the authority of a learned person.

    Does this sentence imply that 'the word' has two meanings (''authority in general" and also, "the authority of a learned person"); or does is it mean that the word has one meaning (the part after the comma being merely an elucidation of what is exactly meant by 'authority' in this case)?
    Last edited by navi tasan; 05-Nov-2009 at 02:06.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: the word

    I'm sorry, but I could not follow your question.

    Could you ask it again using simpler sentences?

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    #3

    Re: the word

    Thanks BarbD,

    I'll try to make thing clear, but I am not sure this will work.

    1-The latin word 'X' means authority, the authority of a learned person.
    (let us assume that 'X' is a latin word.)

    Now does 'X' have two meanings, or one?
    Does it just mean 'the authority of a learned person', or does it have also the general meaning of 'authority', as well as the more specific meaning of 'the authority of a learned person'?

    Consider:
    2-The latin word 'X' means authority and the authority of a learned person.

    Well here the word has two meanings, one of them being a special case of another one. It could just mean 'authority' and it could have the more specific meaning of 'the authority of a learned person'.

    3-The latin word 'X' means 'authority' in its large sense and also , in a much narrower usage, 'the authority of a learned person'.

    Can 1 mean the same as 2 & 3?

    On the other hand, there is the possiblity that sentence 1 is equivalent to:

    4-The latin word 'X' means 'authority', not just any kind of authority, but 'the authority of a learned person'.

    Can 1 mean the same as 4?

    ---------------------------------------------------

    5-I was talking to the President, the President of the United States.

    Here one would assume that I am talking to one person.

    There is probably a chance that (if I am not American) I am talking to the President of my own country and to the President of the Unites States, but if I don't put an 'and' instead of the comma, I think I'd be writing a pretty bad sentence.


  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: the word

    Ah, okay.

    Well, I sort of understand, but I'm not sure I know the answer.

    It's not the best way to give a definition. With an "or" it would have been clear that it meant either, and with the word "specifically" it would be clear that it was giving clarifying information.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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