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  1. ongetz's Avatar

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    #1

    "miss" as a noun

    Hello~

    Is it possible to use "miss" as a noun in this context?

    Ex. You had two misses. ( which means you got two incorrect answers or you had to mistakes)

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: "miss" as a noun

    Quote Originally Posted by ongetz View Post
    Hello~

    Is it possible to use "miss" as a noun in this context?

    Ex. You had two misses. ( which means you got two incorrect answers or you had to mistakes)
    The example cited may not be appropriate, but the word can be used as a countable noun to refer to some incident which fail to hit or hold something or to avoid something. As:

    Did he score a goal in the last match? No, it was a miss or he had two misses.
    We usually go to the island every summer for holidaying, but we've decided to give it a miss this year.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "miss" as a noun

    Quote Originally Posted by ongetz View Post
    Hello~

    Is it possible to use "miss" as a noun in this context?

    Ex. You had two misses. ( which means you got two incorrect answers or you had to mistakes)
    From the point of view of Br English, this is fine*. Aspects of the previous correction are not, but I don't speak Indian English.

    * Fine, but informal.

    b

  3. ongetz's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: "miss" as a noun

    Is this very common in Br English??

    You had two misses

    ( which is equivalent to YOu got two mistakes in a written test)

    If this is informal, is it just fine to write this in a teacher's test description??

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "miss" as a noun

    Quote Originally Posted by ongetz View Post
    Is this very common in Br English??

    You had two misses

    ( which is equivalent to YOu got two mistakes in a written test)

    If this is informal, is it just fine to write this in a teacher's test description??
    It's quite common. Whether this was the first use, I don't know, but in the early '60s there was a BBC TV programme called Juke Box Jury - and at the end of each record discussed the chairman said either 'The jury thinks that's going to be a hit' or 'I'm afraid the jury says that's going to be a miss'. Since then - and possibly before - people have said 'that's a miss' to denote any lack of success/failure to hit a target of some kind.

    I would regard it as fine for a teacher to use when marking a test - especially when dealing with a generally good result; 'You did very well overall, with only two misses'. - the slight informality reduces the sense of failure in this sort of context.

    b

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