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    #1

    for or/and to

    Hello!

    Would you like to com to dinner on Friday?

    Can I use a preposition for instead of to?

    Thanks a lot in advance!

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: for or/and to

    Quote Originally Posted by greegorush View Post
    Hello!

    Would you like to com to dinner on Friday?

    Can I use a preposition for instead of to?

    Thanks a lot in advance!
    Yes you can.

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    #3

    Re: for or/and to

    Thanks a lot, bhaisahab!

    Am I right that after for comes a noun and after to - a verb in this case?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: for or/and to

    Quote Originally Posted by greegorush View Post
    Thanks a lot, bhaisahab!

    Am I right that after for comes a noun and after to - a verb in this case?
    No, "dinner" is a noun in both cases. "If you said "would you like to come to dine...?" "To dine" is a verb.


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    #5

    Re: for or/and to

    geegorush: do you understand the difference between "come for dinner" and "come to dinner"?

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    #6

    Re: for or/and to

    Quote Originally Posted by Excalibur View Post
    geegorush: do you understand the difference between "come for dinner" and "come to dinner"?
    No, to be honest.

    I passed a topic about for and to
    It is explained in this way:

    for + noun
    to + verb (infinitive)

    But to is a preposition in this example. I'd be glad if you explain the difference.


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    #7

    Re: for or/and to

    Suggesting that someone 'come for dinner' is informal, and implies that, whatever you're cooking for tea, you'll make double; or if a family situation, an extra table setting will be provided, and you just join the family for dinner.
    "Look - after work, why not come round for dinner and we can go on to the stag party from there?"

    Inviting someone to dinner is more formal. It suggests that the person is to be a special guest, and that the food served will be more special than what one might normally have for an evening meal; probably with wine and a special desert.

    John starts a new job, and John's wife suggests that he invite his new boss and his wife to dinner. John and his wife will obviously try to impress, (as opposed to 'taking pot luck'=sharing in whatever has been cooked for the evening meal that night.)

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