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    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 127
    #1

    for or to?

    Dear teachers,
    I have a problem with finding a correct prepostition as my dictionary gives to and doesn't explain their use.
    Which one is better in my sentence:
    The evidence provides grounds for sentencing him.
    OR
    The evidence provides ground to sentence him.

    I'll be relly obliged for your kind help.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #2

    Re: for or to?

    Quote Originally Posted by cat's_eyes View Post
    Dear teachers,
    I have a problem with finding a correct prepostition as my dictionary gives to and doesn't explain their use.
    Which one is better in my sentence:
    The evidence provides grounds for sentencing him.
    OR
    The evidence provides ground to sentence him.

    I'll be relly obliged for your kind help.
    Both sentences work. In the first sentence, the objective complement is an infinitive clause. As for the second one, a prepositional phrase does this job. Ground/grounds? There is probably a subtle difference that I can put my finger on.

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