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    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 25
    #1

    Classroom rules

    Hi, I've taught ESL in the states for a long time, but now i live in Israel and my hebrew is well, "growing." I'm being offered the chance to teach English as a Foreign Language and understand there are some significant differences. One that comes to mind is - how to teach class rules when I don't really have enough command of Hebrew. Does anyone have any ideas?

    Like, ordinarily I'd have a range of students and we'd go over the rules, maybe even write them together, practice them, etc, but being that English was the dominant language and the heard "Hold up your hand and wait to be called on" basically in every class, they understood that concept and/or could rely on context and the others more advanced. Here, this stuff is taught in Hebrew and I won't be using Hebrew at all. Does anyone have experience with this?

    Also, they want a model lesson and like i said, i've taught for years, but it's quite different where I don't represent the dominant language. In fact, i don't even speak the dominant language, and I represent a minority. Any suggestions? Things to do, not do, experiences you'd had that would help me....

    thanks-
    rut

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,604
    #2

    Re: Classroom rules

    Quote Originally Posted by rbiton View Post
    Hi, I've taught ESL in the states for a long time, but now i live in Israel and my hebrew is well, "growing." I'm being offered the chance to teach English as a Foreign Language and understand there are some significant differences. One that comes to mind is - how to teach class rules when I don't really have enough command of Hebrew. Does anyone have any ideas?

    Like, ordinarily I'd have a range of students and we'd go over the rules, maybe even write them together, practice them, etc, but being that English was the dominant language and the heard "Hold up your hand and wait to be called on" basically in every class, they understood that concept and/or could rely on context and the others more advanced. Here, this stuff is taught in Hebrew and I won't be using Hebrew at all. Does anyone have experience with this?

    Also, they want a model lesson and like i said, i've taught for years, but it's quite different where I don't represent the dominant language. In fact, i don't even speak the dominant language, and I represent a minority. Any suggestions? Things to do, not do, experiences you'd had that would help me....

    thanks-
    rut
    This is a very complex question, there are differing views on this subject, I teach in France, in my expreince you have to try to teach through English and use as much of the local language as you can to explain certain points that your students have not understood; you can also use pictures, realia, etc. If you continue to teach in Israel I would strongly recommend that you take classes in Hebrew. I used to teach in India and I took classes in Hindi so as to be able to explain when it was too difficult to do so in Englsh.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 25
    #3

    Re: Classroom rules

    Yes, thanks. I do live here, and continue to learn, but it's not as quick a language to pick up as a romance language, fewer cognates, etc and i didn't learn it growing up as many do. I'll just have to do a quick intensive lesson with friends who speak it better, like it isn't really often you hear in normal life - raise your hand, push in your chair before leaving, etc. It just doens't come up and as you probably know we say Push in your chair, but to translate that literally might just not work. it might be something more like close your chair, or move your chair, you know? not literally push in...

    I'm thinking i'll just come in for the model lesson and do a QUICK demonstration of the rules: raise my hand BIG and model talking, maybe make it funny and over the top so that it's the movement as much as the language that gets the point across. And sort of make it big enough they can't avoid it, get them engaged quickly and hope that works for now. if i get the job, then i'd like to do a whole "system" which would need more explaining.
    thanks again.

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