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    #1

    tense related question

    Is the following sentence correct? If not, why not?

    "Although she will be in London for only three days, it may be an opportunity of a lifetime for her to meet some relatives whom she otherwise will never meet."

    Even if it is correct, is there a better way to express the idea?
    Thanks.

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: tense related question

    Quote Originally Posted by sane View Post
    Is the following sentence correct? If not, why not?

    "Although she will be in London for only three days, it may be an opportunity of a lifetime for her to meet some relatives whom she otherwise would (will) never have met."

    Even if it is correct, is there a better way to express the idea?
    Thanks.
    Use would have since it is a future conditional. You can say this way:
    Although she will be in London for only three days, it may be a lifetime opportunity for her to meet some relatives whom she would never have met otherwise. Or
    Although she will be in London for only three days, it may be her lifetime opportunity to meet some relatives whom she would never have met otherwise.


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    #3

    Re: tense related question

    "Although she will be in London for only three days, it may be an opportunity of a lifetime for her to meet some relatives whom she otherwise will never meet."

    "Although she will be in London for only three days, it would be an opportunity of a lifetime for her to meet some relatives whom she otherwise may never meet."

    (Both 'may' and 'might' are possibilities in 'otherwise may/might never meet'. Since this is regarded as 'an opportunity of a lifetime' - and so without, it is highly unlikely they would EVER meet - 'may' is preferable as it indicates a much stronger sense of possibility (that they would never meet).

    To use "whom she would never have met otherwise," 'have met' indicates a form of Present Perfect (actually, 'would (never) have met', and Present Perfect refers to time prior to the moment of speaking - hence, you could only use this sentence AFTER the 'meeting of the relatives' had actually taken place.

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