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    • Join Date: Nov 2009
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    #1

    Post three sheets from the wing

    I've herd this expression and assume that the meaning is something like-very drank. Can someone provide me with more info on this, like use or origin.
    Thanks

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: three sheets from the wing

    Hi zoran,
    Three sheets to the WIND, and yes, it means very drunk.

    Once you have the right word, you'll have an easier time finding stories about its origin. Here's one.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: three sheets from the wing

    Quote Originally Posted by zoran View Post
    I've herd this expression and assume that the meaning is something like-very drank. Can someone provide me with more info on this, like use or origin.
    Thanks
    The expression is "Three sheets to the wind" and it does mean very drunk.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
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    #4

    Re: three sheets from the wing

    right, i got it. Thanks


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
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    #5

    Re: three sheets from the wing

    Sailors at that time had a sliding scale of drunkenness; three sheets was the falling over stage; tipsy was just 'one sheet in the wind',

    To add a little to the Moderator's posting above:

    "Landlubbers might think that a sheet is a sail, but it’s actually a rope (always called a 'line' in sailing terminology), or sometimes on really big ships, a 'chain', which is attached to the bottom corner of a sail. The word actually comes from an Old English term for the corner of a sail. The sheets (that is, ropes) were as vital in the days of three-masted square-rigged sea-going ships as they are today, since they trim the sail to the wind. If they run loose, the sail flutters about in the wind and the ship wallows off its course out of control.
    Extend this idea to sailors on shore leave, staggering back to the ship after a good night on the town, well tanked up. The irregular and uncertain locomotion of these jolly tars must have reminded onlookers of the way a ship moved when the sheets were loose."

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