Results 1 to 8 of 8
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Indonesian
      • Home Country:
      • Indonesia
      • Current Location:
      • Indonesia

    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 17
    #1

    Preposition of Time

    Dear all,

    I need advice on using preposition of time ("AT", "IN"). Usually for the years we are supposed to use the "IN" preposition. But can somebody explain why we use "AT" for these sentences quoted from internet:
    - Let's start at 1980 to narrow the field a bit - that made the theatrical experience more than worth the price of admission.

    - Looking back at 1980..

    Thanks for your help and attention.

  1. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #2

    Re: Preposition of Time

    Quote Originally Posted by s3thdy View Post
    Dear all,

    I need advice on using preposition of time ("AT", "IN"). Usually for the years we are supposed to use the "IN" preposition. But can somebody explain why we use "AT" for these sentences quoted from internet:
    - Let's start at 1980 to narrow the field a bit - that made the theatrical experience more than worth the price of admission.

    - Looking back at 1980..

    Thanks for your help and attention.
    At refers to a point in time, a point along a time line. Using "in" has the reader looking inside the time. For example,


    • Let's start in 1980--the month of March to be exact.
    • Looking back in(side) the year, ...
    • Looking back at the year, as a whole, ...

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Indonesian
      • Home Country:
      • Indonesia
      • Current Location:
      • Indonesia

    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 17
    #3

    Re: Preposition of Time

    So if I may rephrase it: the sentences were used to refer to the entire year, thus it is more appropriate to use "AT".

    Thanks for your explanation.

  2. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #4

    Re: Preposition of Time

    Quote Originally Posted by s3thdy View Post
    So if I may rephrase it: the sentences were used to refer to the entire year, thus it is more appropriate to use "AT".

    Thanks for your explanation.
    I'm not sure. Could you give us an example sentence?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Indonesian
      • Home Country:
      • Indonesia
      • Current Location:
      • Indonesia

    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 17
    #5

    Re: Preposition of Time

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    I'm not sure. Could you give us an example sentence?
    I pick the two sentences I mentioned in my post:
    Top 5 Action Scenes - 1980 to 2009 ? WHAT WOULD TOTO WATCH?
    Looking back at 1980 - Aylesbury Today

    Thanks.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 191
    #6

    Re: Preposition of Time

    Think of the sentence, "The train leaves at 5 p.m."

    'at' expresses a single point in time.

    Looking at Maldovian-American international relations:
    So- "Let's start at 1980 to narrow the field a bit" refers to a single point in time, like condensing the whole year into a dot.

    "Let's start at 1980 to narrow the field a bit, the year Maldovia withdrew from the UN. Between 1980 and 1991, relations with Maldovia continued to deteriorate. Then, in 1992, - (that is, sometime within that year, some month, a particular unspecified day) - Maldovia launched an all-out attack on ..."

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Indonesian
      • Home Country:
      • Indonesia
      • Current Location:
      • Indonesia

    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 17
    #7

    Re: Preposition of Time

    Quote Originally Posted by Excalibur View Post
    Think of the sentence, "The train leaves at 5 p.m."

    'at' expresses a single point in time.

    Looking at Maldovian-American international relations:
    So- "Let's start at 1980 to narrow the field a bit" refers to a single point in time, like condensing the whole year into a dot.

    "Let's start at 1980 to narrow the field a bit, the year Maldovia withdrew from the UN. Between 1980 and 1991, relations with Maldovia continued to deteriorate. Then, in 1992, - (that is, sometime within that year, some month, a particular unspecified day) - Maldovia launched an all-out attack on ..."
    So Excalibur, may I rephrase my understanding: if I want to refer to the entire year, it is more appropriate to use "AT" than "IN"?

    Or maybe I should differentiate the using of "AT" with "DURING"?
    Last edited by s3thdy; 22-Nov-2009 at 23:22.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 191
    #8

    Re: Preposition of Time

    if I want to refer to the entire year, it is more appropriate to use "AT" than "IN"?

    Be very careful here:
    The answer to your question is "NO"... because by "entire year", you seem to be referring to something that happened within the time period of that year.

    'at' refers to a single point in time.

    Let's keep going here - I don't think we've explained it enough to you.
    Last edited by Excalibur; 23-Nov-2009 at 01:09.

Similar Threads

  1. Difference of time preposition in and during
    By jhondoe in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-Aug-2008, 14:17
  2. present perfect with once
    By e2e4 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 11-Jul-2008, 13:14
  3. Is Yesterday a past time?
    By shun in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 13-Feb-2008, 19:54
  4. about preposition of time at,on
    By Nasir Khan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Jun-2007, 08:19
  5. How do you teach TIME ?
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-May-2007, 15:35

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •