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  1. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #1

    Got / has got/ has gotten - US & UK

    Hi everyone,

    I know that the have/got/gotten works differently on the two sides of the pond. However, I have a mental block when it comes to understanding the UK forms.

    I thought if I asked here for native British speakers to tell me what they would say for the following, I might finally get it straight. (I'm sorry learners, but I really do want to hear from native speakers on what they would naturally say.)

    She's got some nerve!
    Oh no! I've got a stain on my new shirt.
    Uh... you've got a little smudge of something on your cheek... there, yeah, you got it.
    Uh... you have a little smudge of something on your cheek... there, yeah, you got it.

    Look! Seems like Mary's gotten herself a new boyfriend.
    I haven't got all day.

    This little quartet:
    I haven't got a clue!
    I don't have clue!
    Brian doesn't have a clue that Mary is cheating on him.
    Brian hasn't got a clue that Mary is cheating on him.

    Asking what time it is:
    Excuse me, do you have the time?
    Excuse me, have you got the time?

    Asking if they have the capacity to do something:
    Have you go the time to do this project for me today?
    Do you have the time to do this this project for me today?

    I haven't gotten the hang of this yet.


    Thanks very much. I'm looking forward to reading these responses!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 191
    #2

    Smile Re: Got / has got/ has gotten - US & UK

    She's got some nerve!
    Oh no! I've got a stain on my new shirt.
    Uh... you've got a little smudge of something on your cheek... there, yeah, you you've got it.
    Uh... you have a little smudge [STRIKE]of[? (perhaps)/STRIKE] or something on your cheek... there, yeah, you you've got it.


    or
    Uh... you have a little smudge of something on your cheek... there, yeah, you you've got it.

    One of the times when Brit. Eng. would use 'got' instead of 'gotten'.
    I haven't got all day.
    Look! Seems like Mary's gotten got herself a new boyfriend.
    (Definitely, in the colloquial context, 'got' not 'gotten'.

    I haven't got a clue!
    I don't have clue!
    Brian doesn't have a clue that Mary is cheating on him.
    Brian hasn't got a clue that Mary is cheating on him.


    I haven't got a clue! - the speaker of this sentence is feeling/expressing some 'distance' from what the other has said. Perhaps sceptical about what is to come.
    I don't have clue! - more spontaneous, more eager to hear the gossip!.
    Brian doesn't have a clue that Mary is cheating on him. - note of disdain for 'poor old Brian'.
    Brian hasn't got a clue that Mary is cheating on him. - some sympathy for Brian!

    (Of course, because we are British, there are times when we would use the 'sympathetic' form but the context/tone of voice/shared history of experience of Brian would indicate condemnation of the idiot. Possibly, the use of the 'disdain' form can be said in a sympathetic tone...but the message is clear!)

    Excuse me, do you have the time?
    Excuse me, have you got the time?


    The first sentence is 'genteel English' - it merely enquires whether they have the time, and then TOTALLY leaves it up to them to share that information with you.
    The second rendering is more abrupt, rough and ready - I need the time.
    Which is used depends on the person! THIS person would only ever use the first phrasing.

    The same applies to:
    Have you go the time to do this project for me today?
    Do you have the time to do this this project for me today?


    As for:
    I haven't gotten the hang of this yet.

    This has to be colloquial. Otherwise, in semi-formal/formal, it would be ,"I'm not quite sure.../I don't quite understand..."

    As such, it would be, I haven't got the bloody hang of this yet!
    Last edited by Excalibur; 19-Nov-2009 at 16:05.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,609
    #3

    Re: Got / has got/ has gotten - US & UK

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Hi everyone,

    I know that the have/got/gotten works differently on the two sides of the pond. However, I have a mental block when it comes to understanding the UK forms.

    I thought if I asked here for native British speakers to tell me what they would say for the following, I might finally get it straight. (I'm sorry learners, but I really do want to hear from native speakers on what they would naturally say.)

    She's got some nerve!
    Oh no! I've got a stain on my new shirt.
    Uh... you've got a little smudge of something on your cheek... there, yeah, you got it.
    Uh... you have a little smudge of something on your cheek... there, yeah, you got it.

    Look! Seems like Mary's gotten herself a new boyfriend.
    I haven't got all day.

    This little quartet:
    I haven't got a clue!
    I don't have clue!
    Brian doesn't have a clue that Mary is cheating on him.
    Brian hasn't got a clue that Mary is cheating on him.

    Asking what time it is:
    Excuse me, do you have the time?
    Excuse me, have you got the time?

    Asking if they have the capacity to do something:
    Have you go the time to do this project for me today?
    Do you have the time to do this this project for me today?

    I haven't gotten the hang of this yet.


    Thanks very much. I'm looking forward to reading these responses!
    She's got some nerve! I would say "She has some nerve".
    Oh no! I've got a stain on my new shirt. "I have a stain on my new shirt".
    Uh... you've got a little smudge of something on your cheek... there, yeah, you got it.
    Uh... you have a little smudge of something on your cheek... there, yes, that's it. I would say this.
    Look! Seems like Mary's gotten herself a new boyfriend. "...has a new boyfriend.
    I haven't got all day. or "I don't have all day" depending on how irritated I was.

    This little quartet:
    I haven't got a clue! "I haven't a clue".
    I don't have clue!
    Brian doesn't have a clue that Mary is cheating on him. "...hasn't a clue".
    Brian hasn't got a clue that Mary is cheating on him.

    Asking what time it is:
    Excuse me, do you have the time? This one for me.
    Excuse me, have you got the time?

    Asking if they have the capacity to do something:
    Have you go the time to do this project for me today?
    Do you have the time to do this this project for me today? This one for me.

    I haven't gotten the hang of this yet.
    "I haven't got..."

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