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  1. phorntita's Avatar
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    #1

    greetings

    I doubt when people make greetings towards others what the different is between these 2 sentences:
    1) How do you do ? & 2)How are you doing?
    I assume that no.1 is rather an old -fashioned sentence while no.2 is rather an American usage, right?
    Last edited by phorntita; 19-Nov-2009 at 23:59.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: greetings

    As always, I'm giving the answer that would apply to where I've lived.

    me: Hey phorntita, good to see you again! How've you been?
    You: Good, thanks. Barb, have you met meet Anita?
    me: Hi Anita, nice to meet you.
    Anita: Hey Barb, nice to meet you too. (or just "you too")
    Last edited by Barb_D; 19-Nov-2009 at 18:52.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. phorntita's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: greetings

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    As always, I'm giving the answer that would apply to where I've lived.

    me: Hey phorntita, good to see you again! How've you been?
    You: Good, thanks. Barb, have you met meet Anita?
    me: Hi Anita, nice to meet you.
    Anita: Hey Barb, nice to meet you too. (or just "you too")
    Thank you Barb-D
    But I'd ask only the use of "How do you do? & How are you doing?"

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: greetings

    I'd say "How are you doing" to someone who I know has been going through some difficult times. I would also use it to ask someone working on something, a project of some sort, in which case it would mean "How is your progress" or "Are you experiencing difficulty." (I'm carrying something heavy with someone else and ask "How are you doing?" I see a friend whose father has recently died and as "How are you doing?")

    I would not use it as a greeting - I'd say "How've you been?" if I really wanted to know and "How are you?" if I expected the ritual response of "Fine, thanks, and you?" That's why I gave you "How've you been?" instead of "How are you doing?"


    I would not use "How do you do?" -- This sounds very old-fashioned to me (a user of American English) though I know that it's a proper way to greet someone you are meeting for the first time. That's why I gave you the "Nice to meet you" -- the modern (American) thing to say when being introduced to someone when in year's past you would have heard "How do you do?"
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. phorntita's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: greetings

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I'd say "How are you doing" to someone who I know has been going through some difficult times. I would also use it to ask someone working on something, a project of some sort, in which case it would mean "How is your progress" or "Are you experiencing difficulty." (I'm carrying something heavy with someone else and ask "How are you doing?" I see a friend whose father has recently died and as "How are you doing?")

    I would not use it as a greeting - I'd say "How've you been?" if I really wanted to know and "How are you?" if I expected the ritual response of "Fine, thanks, and you?" That's why I gave you "How've you been?" instead of "How are you doing?"


    I would not use "How do you do?" -- This sounds very old-fashioned to me (a user of American English) though I know that it's a proper way to greet someone you are meeting for the first time. That's why I gave you the "Nice to meet you" -- the modern (American) thing to say when being introduced to someone when in year's past you would have heard "How do you do?"
    Thank you Barb-D I'd like to ask you more why I heard Michael J. said to his fans on stage when he made his "Dangerous tour" in Romania " How are you doing" I wonder what he meant by that question to his audiences at that time. Was it some kind of greeting ?

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: greetings

    Perhaps he meant "Are you having a good time? Is this concert giving you what you hoped it would give you? Is everyone having fun?"

    The way people talk when they are in front of a large crowd may be different from the way they would talk if they met a friend in the coffee shop, so you can't say "this is they way it ALWAYS works/is used."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. phorntita's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: greetings

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Perhaps he meant "Are you having a good time? Is this concert giving you what you hoped it would give you? Is everyone having fun?"

    The way people talk when they are in front of a large crowd may be different from the way they would talk if they met a friend in the coffee shop, so you can't say "this is they way it ALWAYS works/is used."
    Oh! I just realize what it meant by MJ said on that stage. Thanks a million Barb-D

  8. phorntita's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: greetings

    I would not use "How do you do?" -- This sounds very old-fashioned to me (a user of American English) though I know that it's a proper way to greet someone you are meeting for the first time. That's why I gave you the "Nice to meet you" -- the modern (American) thing to say when being introduced to someone when in year's past you would have heard "How do you do?"[/QUOTE]
    Could I conclude that this sentence "Nice to meet you" is a kind of greeting thing when I want to gather all the greeting sentence/ question into a group before making an explanation about it.

  9. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: greetings

    Yes, at least for greetings in the US.

    When you are introduced to someone for the first time, "Nice to meet you" is a very normal thing to say. (And at the end of the conversation, you say "It was nice meeting you" or "It was nice to meet (or "to have met") you" and the other person will say "You too" before you walk away.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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