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    • Join Date: Sep 2009
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    #1

    'deliver' vs 'supply'

    Hello friends!

    Please tell me which is better in this case and of there is a difference between 'deliver' and 'supply':

    The gas is supplied through pipe lines to Moldova.

    The gas is delivered through pipe lines to Moldova.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: 'deliver' vs 'supply'

    Quote Originally Posted by Helissax View Post
    Hello friends!

    Please tell me which is better in this case and of there is a difference between 'deliver' and 'supply':

    The gas is supplied through pipe lines to Moldova.

    The gas is delivered through pipe lines to Moldova.
    Either of these is correct, since the gas is both supplied and delivered.

    The words don't mean the same thing.
    It is possible that two stores can supply you with the same item, but only one will deliver it (bring it to your home).

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 'deliver' vs 'supply'

    Delivery generally means bringing it to you on an individual basis. Supply is more abstract, and means being someone who makes it available to you.

  3. Newbie
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    #4

    Re: 'deliver' vs 'supply'

    Quote Originally Posted by Helissax View Post
    Hello friends!

    Please tell me which is better in this case and of there is a difference between 'deliver' and 'supply':

    The gas is supplied through pipe lines to Moldova.

    The gas is delivered through pipe lines to Moldova.
    Both the options are correct in grammatical & usage sense.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
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    #5

    Re: 'deliver' vs 'supply'

    This still does not get down to the basic difference in this context.

    'supply' means providing something needed or wanted.

    'deliver' (in this context) means provide something promised or expected.

    So - with the expression, "The gas is delivered through pipelines to Moldova."
    the speaker's point of view is of fulfilling the obligation of his country to make sure the gas arrives in Moldova.

    The expression, "The gas is supplied through pipelines to Moldova." indicates that the speaker's point of view is of meeting the needs of Moldova for gas (and they do that via pipelines, as opposed to trucks filled with liquid petroleum gas, for example).

    If the speaker doesn't appreciate the difference, then it is similar to the speaker on TV today, who said: "...putting other motorists at danger."

    in danger
    at risk
    Last edited by Excalibur; 21-Nov-2009 at 15:19.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: 'deliver' vs 'supply'

    Quote Originally Posted by Excalibur View Post
    This still does not get down to the basic difference in this context.

    'supply' means providing something needed or wanted.

    'deliver' (in this context) means provide something promised or expected.

    So - with the expression, "The gas is delivered through pipelines to Moldova."
    the speaker's point of view is of fulfilling the obligation of his country to make sure the gas arrives in Moldova.
    So you have to Moldovan to use this form? Or do you mean a native of the country delivering the gas? I think this sentence could be used by a speaker with no affiliation at all with Moldova, either on the supply or receipt side.

    The expression, "The gas is supplied through pipelines to Moldova." indicates that the speaker's point of view is of meeting the needs of Moldova for gas (and they do that via pipelines, as opposed to trucks filled with liquid petroleum gas, for example).
    R.


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    #7

    Re: 'deliver' vs 'supply'

    I apologise to Helissax for the relative brevity of my response to his thread, that I did not consider ALL possibilities, and that the sentences, "The gas is supplied through pipe lines to Moldova" and "The gas is delivered through pipe lines to Moldova" could equally have been spoken by a proud Moldovian, thinking of the progress of his country, but nevertheless aware of the difference in meaning, and choosing between talking about the technological achievement of the construction of these pipelines; or, perhaps, thinking about the progress his country his made with the energy resource now being supplied to his country.

    My only excuse for being so remiss, is that THIS writer's main intent was to differentiate the meanings of 'deliver' and 'supply', not the nationality of the speaker, or varied contexts in which such sentences might be spoken.
    Last edited by Excalibur; 21-Nov-2009 at 16:26.

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