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    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #1

    a lollipop VS the lollipop

    I would like to know, how to deal with the word "lollipop". It seems that it's always used with an indefinite article "a", even when used more times in our speach. And with a definite article "the" only when it's connected to something e.g. The Lollipop Girl... . Am I wrong? Can I use "a lollipop" first time and "the lollipop" every next time I will mention "lollipop"?

  1. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a lollipop VS the lollipop

    It depends on how you want to modify the word lollipop. For example, the Lollipop Girl is a specific person or character, whereas a Lollipop Girl is one of many, not a particular Lollipop Girl.

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    #3

    Smile Re: a lollipop VS the lollipop

    Quote Originally Posted by thx0110 View Post
    I would like to know, how to deal with the word "lollipop". It seems that it's always used with an indefinite article "a", even when used more times in our speach. And with a definite article "the" only when it's connected to something e.g. The Lollipop Girl... . Am I wrong? Can I use "a lollipop" first time and "the lollipop" every next time I will mention "lollipop"?
    Hello I am a student, not a teacher,

    but the use of the definite article implies that both persons, the speaker and the listener know about who or what you are taking.

    It's depend of the situation, maybe if there is only one lollipop in a room, you can use 'the' at second time you speak about this girl.

    For me if people around you know who is the lollipop you must use the definite article, it's what I mean.

    Hope it's help you.

    See you soon.


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    #4

    Re: a lollipop VS the lollipop VS lollipop

    Thanks, but what about this famous song. Some articles are completely missing, e.g. "But lollipop is mine" or "Call my baby lollipop" or this refrain "Lollipop lollipop, oh lolli lolli lolli" Why? Is it just a wrong translation? :

    Lollipop - Beverly Ross and Julius Dixon (Lyrics and Chords)

    ARTIST: Beverly Ross and Julius Dixon
    TITLE: Lollipop
    Lyrics and Chords


    {Refrain}
    Lollipop lollipop, oh lolli lolli lolli
    Lollipop lollipop, oh lolli lolli lolli
    Lollipop lollipop, oh lolli lolli lolli
    Lollipop (*pop*)

    / C Am Dm7 G7 / / / C - G7 - /

    Call my baby lollipop, tell you why
    His kiss is sweeter than an apple pie
    And when he does his shaky rockin' dance
    Man, I haven't got a chance

    / C F C F / C Am7 Dm7 G7 / 1st / G7 - - - /

    I call him
    {Refrain}

    Sweeter than candy on a stick
    Huckleberry, cherry or lime
    If you had a choice, he'd be your pick
    But lollipop is mine

    / F - - - / C F C - / F - - - / D7 - G7 - /

    {Refrain}

    Crazy way he thrills me, tell you why
    Just like a lightning from the sky
    He loves to kiss me till I can't see straight
    Gee, my lollipop is great

    I call him
    {Refrain}

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    #5

    Re: a lollipop VS the lollipop VS lollipop

    Hello,

    I know this song but I think it's like in title newspapers they often write in telegraphic style.

    I am not sure , I'm just a learner.

    I believe sometimes the writers take liberties with formal English writing.

    Hope it's help you. Sorry but I can't help you more like this.

    Have a nice day.

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    #6

    Re: a lollipop VS the lollipop VS lollipop

    thx0110,

    Lollipop is used as a name; i.e. "Call my baby (this name:) Lollipop", much like, say, Dad is used for father or Mom for mother. Those are not their names, of course, but nonetheless they represent names, and the reason a determiner isn't required.

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    #7

    Smile Re: a lollipop VS the lollipop VS lollipop

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    thx0110,

    Lollipop is used as a name; i.e. "Call my baby (this name:) Lollipop", much like, say, Dad is used for father or Mom for mother. Those are not their names, of course, but nonetheless they represent names, and the reason a determiner isn't required.
    Hello Soup,

    these three words, Dad, Mon, and Lollipop behave themselves like proper nouns and naturallly we can't omit the use of determiners.

    Am I right?

    Thanks Soup ( you have an original name).

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    #8

    Re: a lollipop VS the lollipop VS lollipop

    Quote Originally Posted by The French View Post
    Hello Soup,

    [T]hese three words, Dad, Mo[m], and Lollipop behave themselves like proper nouns and natura[ll]y we can
    't omit the use of determiners.

    Am I right?
    If you mean that proper nouns don't require a determiner, then, yes, you are most indubitably correct.

    -----------
    Thank you for the compliment.

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