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    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #1

    you can smell

    What about this rhyme:

    she knows (exactly) how to express herself
    it's not just her perfume you can smell (well)

    ---
    Is it grammatically correct? What about the second sentence, more precisely this part: "you can smell" or "you can smell well". Is it OK?

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: you can smell

    Quote Originally Posted by thx0110 View Post
    What about this rhyme:

    she knows (exactly) how to express herself
    it's not just her perfume you can smell (well)

    ---
    Is it grammatically correct? What about the second sentence, more precisely this part: "you can smell" or "you can smell well". Is it OK?
    Yes, both are grammatical. The use of 'well' in the sentence modifies the verb 'smell', meaning; You can smell distinctly. You can complete it by adding more infomation, as:
    It's not just her perfume you can smell well but there is something more in her scented dress.
    Last edited by sarat_106; 22-Nov-2009 at 04:39.


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #3

    Re: you can smell

    Thanks sarat_106,

    but if I add something more it will be very long, and I need it to rhyme with the previous sentence.

    So, if "well" is not a good choice, could I leave it as:

    she knows exactly how to express herself
    it's not just her perfume you can smell


    Or is this also OK?

    she knows exactly how to express herself
    it's not just her perfume you can smell well


    Which combination sounds more familiar and casual to a native English speaker?

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: you can smell

    Quote Originally Posted by thx0110 View Post
    she knows exactly how to express herself
    it's not just her perfume you can smell
    This doesn't sound very romantic in English.
    By which means of smelling does she express herself so exactly?


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #5

    Re: you can smell

    she expresses herself by the perfume and not just by the perfume, but also with her dress code, acting, gestures etc...


    ---
    if the word "smell" is not the right "romantic" word for having noticed her perfume, than which word is?

    ---
    And what about this.

    she knows exactly how to express herself
    it's not just her perfume you can smell well

    Does it sound better?


    ===
    What's wrong with:

    she knows exactly how to express herself
    it's not just her perfume you can smell well

    Is it rude or too much sensual/animalistic?

    Last edited by thx0110; 22-Nov-2009 at 08:56.


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 165
    #6

    Re: you can smell

    Maybe, this sounds better, let me know :)

    What if I use the verb "love" or "like", and it will go like this:

    she knows well how to express herself
    it's not just her perfume you love to smell


    OR

    she knows well how to express herself
    it's not just her perfume you like to smell


    Thanks for your opinion guys.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: you can smell

    Quote Originally Posted by thx0110 View Post
    she expresses herself by the perfume and not just by the perfume, but also with her dress code, acting, gestures etc...

    No, you can't smell her dress code, acting, or gestures. And you can't use "smell" (effectively) to describe your sense of these things.

    she knows exactly how to express herself
    it's not just her perfume you can smell well

    Is it rude or too much sensual/animalistic?

    she knows exactly how to express herself
    it's not just her perfume you can smell

    If you said to me "She expresses herself very well by smelling" I'd think you were referring to creative farting, or a body odour she could change at will. Either way, to me it sounds unpleasant and, as I say, unromantic.
    There are only a limited numbers of ways you can express yourself with smell. You've ruled out perfume. If you're referring to her cooking, you probably should explicitly state that. Otherwise, 'smell' is not the best word. 'Sense' is slightly better.
    R.


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #8

    Re: you can smell

    I smell your perfume

    OR

    I sense your perfume

    ?

    I think "I smell your perfume" is better. Or?


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #9

    Re: you can smell

    Why is "I sense your perfume." used more often than "I smell your perfume." ?


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    #10

    Re: you can smell

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Originally Posted by thx0110
    she expresses herself by the perfume and not just by the perfume, but also with her dress code, acting, gestures etc...

    No, you can't smell her dress code, acting, or gestures. And you can't use "smell" (effectively) to describe your sense of these things.

    she knows exactly how to express herself
    it's not just her perfume you can smell well

    Is it rude or too much sensual/animalistic?

    she knows exactly how to express herself
    it's not just her perfume you can smell

    If you said to me "She expresses herself very well by smelling" I'd think you were referring to creative farting, or a body odour she could change at will. Either way, to me it sounds unpleasant and, as I say, unromantic.
    There are only a limited numbers of ways you can express yourself with smell. You've ruled out perfume. If you're referring to her cooking, you probably should explicitly state that. Otherwise, 'smell' is not the best word. 'Sense' is slightly better.
    she knows exactly how to express herself
    it's her perfume you love/like to smell

    clothes she wears and gestures she makes
    she's now independent like nobody else
    ...

    Better now? Or still something missing?

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