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    #1

    Right Away or Immediately?

    Hi All,

    People always say "right away", "right away" is same meaning of "immediately"? If yes, which one is popular in spoken english?

    Thanks and Regards,

    William

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Right Away or Immediately?

    Quote Originally Posted by yiuho View Post
    Hi All,

    People always say "right away", "right away" is same meaning of "immediately"? If yes, which one is popular in spoken english?

    Thanks and Regards,

    William
    I would say that both are equally used.


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    #3

    Re: Right Away or Immediately?

    bhaisahab: I would say that both are equally used.

    ...which means 50% of the time, one is used by native speakers in preference to the other.

    Which begs the question....................why?

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Right Away or Immediately?

    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.


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    #5

    Re: Right Away or Immediately?

    touché.
    A hit - a palpable hit.


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    #6

    Re: Right Away or Immediately?

    NOW - have we, as native speakers, really cleared up the use of these 'equally used' terms for yiuho?

    My comment was meant to be a spur to bhaisahab - (or, as he is a VIP member of the forum, so prove it) - would "a good kick up the backside" be an 'equally used' expression?

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Right Away or Immediately?

    Without studying the relative frequency of each phrase as they appear in writing, my instinct is the same as his. I hear each one used, and I haven't noticed one being used more than the other.

    In a business memo, I would expect "The changes to into effect immediately," so perhaps it's the more formal of the two.

    I used to work with someone who used "directly." "I'll get working on that directly." I kind of liked that use.


    (FWIW, I was a BTQ misuser as well until someone who studied debate explained what it was supposed to mean.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.


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    #8

    Re: Right Away or Immediately?

    Moderator: Without studying the relative frequency of each phrase as they appear in writing,

    That's precisely the problem. Is yiuho really...really.. asking for, "Use 'right away' 42% of the time and 'immediately' 58% the rest. Have fun!"

    Surreal. Any second, a hare is going to post: "I'm late, I'm late. For a very important date."
    Last edited by Excalibur; 23-Nov-2009 at 00:02.

  4. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Right Away or Immediately?

    Right away is good old Anglo-Saxon, whereas immediately is French, with one of our own suffixes affixed. Draw what conclusions you may, but I find French is used in English in legal, formal or academic situations, while Anglo-Saxon equivalents are used in less formal, ordinary ones. Exception: in the British military, "right away" is more common, despite the apparent need for formality. I suppose they usually think of the French as the enemy.

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    #10

    Re: Right Away or Immediately?

    Thank you for your replies except Excalibur. Excalibur, please behave yourself...

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