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  1. phorntita's Avatar
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    #1

    better English

    I wonder which is better/best among:
    1) I told you long time ago about that things, I've to say.
    I've to say, I told you long time ago about that things.
    2 It's very informative, I think.
    I think, it's very informative.
    It's very informative.
    3) It's very interesting, you could imagine.
    You could imagine, it's very interesting.

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    #2

    Re: better English

    Quote Originally Posted by phorntita View Post
    I wonder which is better/best among:
    1) I told you (a) long time ago about those things, I have to say. When speaking, pause after "things".
    I have to say, I told you (a) long time ago about those things. more common

    2 It's very informative, I think.
    I think it's very informative. (without the comma) more common than the first one
    It's very informative. You don't think it's informative; you know it is.

    3) It's very interesting, as you could imagine.
    As you could imagine, it's very interesting.
    Both are equally good.
    2006
    Last edited by 2006; 30-Nov-2009 at 07:00.

  2. phorntita's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: better English

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    2006
    Thank you 2006,
    I think it's some kind of informal spoken things, right? I think I heard it on TV people made some discussion on economics.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: better English

    Hi -
    I see in a chat room for ESL learners that many people use "I've" or "I'm" when it's the main verb.

    Are you going to visit your parents this weekend?
    Yes, I'm.

    Have you ever visited the pyramids?
    Yes, I've.

    This is decidedly non-native -- at least, in the English I hear spoken around me. We contract only when it's an auxiliary verb. Yes, I'm going. Yes, I've been there.

    It seems it applies with "have" serving the function of "must." I have to say would never be "I've to say." In fact, it would sound more like "I hafta say" in rapid speech.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. phorntita's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: better English

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Hi -
    I see in a chat room for ESL learners that many people use "I've" or "I'm" when it's the main verb.

    Are you going to visit your parents this weekend?
    Yes, I'm.

    Have you ever visited the pyramids?
    Yes, I've.

    This is decidedly non-native -- at least, in the English I hear spoken around me. We contract only when it's an auxiliary verb. Yes, I'm going. Yes, I've been there.

    It seems it applies with "have" serving the function of "must." I have to say would never be "I've to say." In fact, it would sound more like "I hafta say" in rapid speech.
    Thank you Barb-D
    It's safer that we use all the full words rather than the contraction ones, right?
    About 2006 reply above , I assume that when we left the clauses like
    " I think"/ "I've told you before"/ "you can imagine that" at the end of any sentences, I wonder whether it is Native spoken English & is it good to do so nowadays , Barb-D ?
    Please clarify it for me.
    Last edited by phorntita; 01-Dec-2009 at 22:47.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: better English

    I agree with 2006's post.

    Sometimes we add the "I think" at the end to stress that it's an opinion - you don't consider yourself the expert, or you add it as an after-thought when you realize that you're not completely sure. It makes your message less forceful (and therefore, perhaps, less abrupt and possibly interpreted as being rude).

    She's gone to pick up Mark, I think. (Realizing I'm not 100% sure but that's what I think I remember her saying she is doing.)
    He's one of the world's greatest painters, I think. (Backing off from my strong opinion so I'm not seen as pushy or rude.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. phorntita's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: better English

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I agree with 2006's post.

    Sometimes we add the "I think" at the end to stress that it's an opinion - you don't consider yourself the expert, or you add it as an after-thought when you realize that you're not completely sure. It makes your message less forceful (and therefore, perhaps, less abrupt and possibly interpreted as being rude).

    She's gone to pick up Mark, I think. (Realizing I'm not 100% sure but that's what I think I remember her saying she is doing.)
    He's one of the world's greatest painters, I think. (Backing off from my strong opinion so I'm not seen as pushy or rude.)
    Thank you Barb-D, it's very informative. I like trying to say what I've heard from many media mostly like TV which I watch /listen to everyday only on English satellite programs. Now the news comes from the economics perspective "Bloomberg". So long (for now) Barb-D
    Phorntita

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