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    #1

    should

    I would like to know the difference between "1(should)" and "2(should)".
    1. You should see a doctor.
    2. A wise man should be careful with his speech.

  1. euncu's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: should

    What makes you think that they are different?
    "to see" and "to be careful" are both verbs.


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    #3

    Re: should

    "to see" and "to be careful" are both verbs.
    'be careful' is not a verb. The poster asked something else. (S)he wanted to know about the difference in modality the two 'should' uses express.

    In the first sentence, 'should' expresses advisability; the second 'should' ... my immediate interpretation is again advisability.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: should

    Both are giving polite advice.

  3. Junior Member
    English Teacher

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    #5

    Re: should

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I would like to know the difference between "1(should)" and "2(should)".
    1. You should see a doctor.
    2. A wise man should be careful with his speech.
    Hi

    If you are confused about the difference in meaning between two similar (or seemingly similar) expressions, try coming up with a synonym for the expressions. This will often help you understand any difference(s) more easily.

    In this case, the modal "ought to" is a synonym for both examples of "should", so we can see that there is no difference between them. (The second sentence, however, is expressing a more general idea than the first one.)

    However, if we look at these two sentences, we can see a clear difference between them in terms of the meaning of "should".

    1. You should have called me. ("should" means "ought to")
    2. Call me should you have any questions. ("should" means "if")

    I hope this helps.

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