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    #1

    The phrase "In turn"

    Under the Federal Reserve System, the nation is divided into twelve districts, each with a Federal Reserve Bank owned by the member banks of its district. In turn, the twelve Reserve Banks are themselves coordinated by a seven-member Federal Reserve Board in Washington.

    In the above sentence, the phrase "in turn" is the question.
    In general, the phrase "in turn" usually means successively. Is this the right sense of the word in this context? Or does it mean "as a result of"? Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: The phrase "In turn"

    Or does it mean "as a result of"?

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    #3

    Exclamation Re: The phrase "In turn"

    Quote Originally Posted by ian2 View Post
    Under the Federal Reserve System, the nation is divided into twelve districts, each with a Federal Reserve Bank owned by the member banks of its district. In turn/As a related effect, the twelve Reserve Banks are themselves coordinated by a seven-member Federal Reserve Board in Washington.

    In the above sentence, the phrase "in turn" is the question.
    In general, the phrase "in turn" usually means successively. Is this the right sense of the word in this context? Or does it mean "as a result of"? Thanks.
    In turn also means: as a related effect and this meaning is applicable here. Look at thisexample:
    The agency wants to put pressure on local business people, so they, in turn, will put pressure on state officials.
    As a result of is prepositional phrase used to join a noun, noun phrase or clause. It means: owing to or as a consequence ofThis does not work here.

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    #4

    Re: The phrase "In turn"

    Thanks. I know this is a prepositional phrase. In fact, I meant "as a result", which can be used here, at least grammatically speaking. Also if this phrase is interpreted as "as related effect", then it is very close to "as consequences", which seems to mean the phrase does mean "as a result".

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    In turn also means: as a related effect and this meaning is applicable here. Look at thisexample:
    The agency wants to put pressure on local business people, so they, in turn, will put pressure on state officials.
    As a result of is prepositional phrase used to join a noun, noun phrase or clause. It means: owing to or as a consequence ofThis does not work here.

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