Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. ha179's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Vietnamese
      • Home Country:
      • Vietnam
      • Current Location:
      • Vietnam

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 171
    #1

    When can we cut down relative pronoun

    I remember being taught that we can cut down relative pronoun (which, who,where...) in some situations such as when the noun it modifies is an object. Can anyone please remind me in what situations else can we cut down relative pronoun?
    I look forward to your replies.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 966
    #2

    Re: When can we cut down relative pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by ha179 View Post
    I remember being taught that we can cut down relative pronoun (which, who,where...) in some situations such as when the noun it modifies is an object. Can anyone please remind me in what situations else can we cut down relative pronoun?
    I look forward to your replies.
    In non-reduced adjectival clauses you can drop the relative pronoun when it functions as the object of the verb in that clause.

    I know the guy (that/who) you met yesterday. -- You met who/that.
    I like the way (that) you speak. -- You speak that.

  2. ha179's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Vietnamese
      • Home Country:
      • Vietnam
      • Current Location:
      • Vietnam

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 171
    #3

    Re: When can we cut down relative pronoun

    I found some sentences that are cut down relative pronouns even the nouns they modify are subjects:
    The last time my father gone fishing was in May 2000.
    'Tien Quan Ca', the Vietnam National Anthem, written in 1944.
    Especially, 'be' is also cut down in the second sentence.
    Can anyone summary when can we cut down relative pronoun and to be?

  3. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #4

    Re: When can we cut down relative pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by ha179 View Post
    I found some sentences that are cut down relative pronouns even the nouns they modify are subjects:
    The last time my father went fishing was in May 2000. Correct
    'Tien Quan Ca', the Vietnam National Anthem, written in 1944.
    The above isn't a sentence. There's no main verb.
    Especially, 'be' is also cut down in the second sentence. Yes, but it's not a sentence.
    Can anyone summary when can we cut down relative pronoun and to be?
    Omitting 'to be' is a different thing. You can do this when you have a phrase in apposition to another one.
    My grandfather, an infantryman, died in World War II. =
    My grandfather, who was an infantryman, died in World War II.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 1,507
    #5

    Re: When can we cut down relative pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by ha179 View Post
    I remember being taught that we can cut down relative pronoun (which, who,where...) in some situations such as when the noun it modifies is an object. Can anyone please remind me in what situations else can we cut down relative pronoun?
    I look forward to your replies.
    I think you are a little confused! Ellipsis of relative pronouns has nothing to do with the case of the noun modified by the relative clause (i.e. the antecedent of the relative pronoun), but with the function of that relative pronoun within its own clause.

    Ellipsis is possible where the relative pronoun functions either as direct object or complement, but not where it functions as subject. Hence

    [1] This is the man that I saw in the park.

    can be condensed to

    [1a] This is the man I saw in the park.

    and

    [2] He is not the person that he once was.

    to

    [2a] He is not the person he once was.

    but

    [3] This is the lady that phoned last night.

    cannot be condensed to

    [3a] *This is the lady phoned last night.

Similar Threads

  1. Exception to the rule? Omission of relative pronoun
    By Federerexpress in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 23-Jan-2010, 14:57
  2. Using the correct relative pronoun
    By ametisto in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Apr-2008, 06:21
  3. Why "where" is an adverb and not a relative pronoun?
    By Deepurple in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 05-Feb-2008, 20:18
  4. 'as' being used as a relative pronoun
    By riceball72 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 30-Nov-2007, 17:35
  5. Attributive Clause - China Needs Your Help
    By ChinaDavid in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-Jan-2005, 16:56

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •