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    #1

    Dickens' or Dickens's

    What is appropriate in possessive punctuation: Charles Dickens' or Charles Dickens's? In my grammar work, it says to put the s after proper noun ending in s unless the proper noun is an historical figure such as Jesus' or Sophocles' for example. Does Charles Dickens serve as an historical figure who deserves the usage of just the apostrophe or should one use the apostrophe plys s. Grammar books themselves differ on the correct usage of the apostrophe with words ending in s. I would appreciate a definitive rule for this especially for instructing students to use when referring to a Charles Dickens's or Dickens' novel. Thank you.

  1. euncu's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Dickens' or Dickens's

    I recommend using the search box to eliminate the possibility of posing long-ago answered (or discussed) questions.

    You may check this link out:https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...-s-plural.html

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    #3

    Smile Re: Dickens' or Dickens's

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer Nevsky View Post
    What is appropriate in possessive punctuation: Charles Dickens' or Charles Dickens's? In my grammar work, it says to put the s after proper noun ending in s unless the proper noun is an historical figure such as Jesus' or Sophocles' for example. Does Charles Dickens serve as an historical figure who deserves the usage of just the apostrophe or should one use the apostrophe plys s. Grammar books themselves differ on the correct usage of the apostrophe with words ending in s. I would appreciate a definitive rule for this especially for instructing students to use when referring to a Charles Dickens's or Dickens' novel. Thank you.
    Hello, I am not a teacher,

    just a French learner who try to improve his level, but I can help you with your quote.

    The real question is to known if you write 'Charles Dickens' or Charles Dickens's' it is a mistake. In my mind the both forms are correct, but if you considers Dickens like a famous figure don't put the 's'. I believe you don't hurt someone for this.

    Hope it's enough for help you.

    Cordially,

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