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    #1

    usage of causative verbs in the science literature

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough toe share with me your opinion concerning the following usage of the causative verbs in the science literature?

    Electrolytic reduction is also used, but many other reagents cause the nitrogen to be split off as ammonia.
    Sulfation in the presence of dehydrating agents such as acetic anhydride is also useful in causing the reaction to go to completion.
    It may be assumed that steric influence causes the heat of polymerization to be 7 kcal less than expected.
    Several requirements have to be satisfied to make such a still operate efficiently and without error.
    Silicon tetraacetat was much more stable and could be made to react with such compounds as alcohol, ether, and ammonia.
    They made the fluid flow through a packed bed of finely divided solid.
    He made this reaction run at reduced pressure.
    It is usually rather different to get nitrogen to combine with other elements.
    We could not get this product to polymerize.
    The properties led him to suggest that they had prepared a novel compound.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: usage of causative verbs in the science literature

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough toe share with me your opinion concerning the following usage of the causative verbs in the science literature?

    Electrolytic reduction is also used, but many other reagents cause the nitrogen to (be) split off from the liquid air to become (as) ammonia (after reacting with hydrogen as: N2+3H2 2NH3).

    Sulfation in the presence of dehydrating agents such as acetic anhydride is also useful in causing the reaction (in increasing the rate of reaction) to go to completion.
    It may be assumed that steric influence causes the heat of polymerization to be 7 kcal less than expected.
    Several requirements have to be satisfied to make such a still operate efficiently and without error.
    Silicon tetraacetat was much more stable and could be made to react with such compounds as alcohol, ether, and ammonia.
    They made the fluid flow through a packed bed of finely divided solid.
    He/It made this reaction run at reduced pressure.
    It is usually rather different to get nitrogen to combine with other elements.
    We could not get this product to polymerize.
    The properties led him to suggest that they had prepared a novel compound.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    As a student of science, I know that amonia is formed by a process called reduction in which Nitrgen is separated/split off from its source(air which is liquified) and made to react with hydrgen.
    Last edited by sarat_106; 07-Dec-2009 at 07:26.

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