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    #1

    ever

    I wonder if there is a subtle difference between "1" and "2".
    1. If you're in Seattle, come and see me.
    2. If you're ever in Seattle, come and see me.

  1. ha179's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: ever

    Not a teacher
    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I wonder if there is a subtle difference between "1" and "2".
    1. If you're in Seattle, come and see me.
    2. If you're ever in Seattle, come and see me.
    I found the definition of ever (Ever Definition | Definition of Ever at Dictionary.com) and I think there is just small different meaning between two sentences, the second sentence gives us a little more information so it depends on what you want to express in your sentence to choose the exact one.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: ever

    The first sounds like the speaker believes the person is in Seattle, or plans to be in the near future.

    In the second, the speaker has no specific belief that the person will be in Seattle at any particular point in the future, but if that does happen, the invitation to visit will apply.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
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    #4

    Re: ever

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I wonder if there is a subtle difference between "1" and "2".
    1. If you're in Seattle, come and see me.
    2. If you're ever in Seattle, come and see me.
    Hi!

    I'm not a teacher.

    The word "ever" is an adverb and means here, in (2.), "at any time".

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