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    #1

    connector

    what are connectors in english language.

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    #2

    Re: connector

    Quote Originally Posted by naqibkkk View Post
    What are connectors in English language?
    Hello,

    I am not a teacher, but I believe you don't have seached on the web what you are looking for.

    Connectors are little words like 'and' used to connect two ideas or two sentences. However it is used for the style of your writting.

    Hope it's help you, see you later and the forum.


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    #3

    Re: connector

    Quote Originally Posted by The French View Post
    I am not a teacher,
    Hi French,

    Would you tell me what the quoted statement is in aid of? I thought that student status and teacher status are mutually exclusive. Am I missing something?

    Connectors are words that join clauses together.


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    #4

    Re: connector

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    Hi French,

    Would you tell me what the quoted statement is in aid of? I thought that student status and teacher status are mutually exclusive. Am I missing something?

    Connectors are words that join clauses together.
    Hi!

    You can be both! In my country you can find university students who successfully teach in some private language schools.

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    #5

    Re: connector

    Quote Originally Posted by naqibkkk View Post
    what are connectors in english language.
    Connectors are a large group of words that serve to join words, phrases or entire sentences. They comprise members of 4 main form-classes:

    1. CONJUNCTIONS
    Although most typically linking clauses, these can connect even simple substantive phrases, as 'and' in 'between you and me'. They consist of two sub-classes, coordinators (and, but, or, etc.) and subordinators (while, because, although, etc.)

    2. CONNECTIVE ADVERBS
    These can, in turn, be of a number of kinds:

    2a. ADNOMINAL RELATIVE ADVERBS
    e.g. 'when' in

    This was the day when his life changed.

    2b. NOMINAL RELATIVE ADVERBS
    e.g. 'where' in

    This is where I was standing when the accident occurred.

    2c. ADVERBIAL CONJUNCTS
    These are words like 'however' and 'therefore' which chiefly provide a semantic link between separate sentences, but are often used like coordinators to link coordinate clauses within the same sentence.

    2d. CONJUNCTIVE ADVERBS
    (N.B. despite apparent similarity of name to 2c, quite different!)
    These are canonically interrogative adverbs (when, where, why, how) used to introduce an embedded, or indirect, question, e.g. 'why' in

    He asked why I had done it.


    (They include all adverbs than can function as interrogatives except for forms in '-ever'.)


    3. CONNECTIVE PRONOUNS
    Similarly divided into RELATIVE (adnominal & nominal) and CONJUNCTIVE

    (N.B. Some grammarians do not recognize the category of conjunctive pronoun, simply classifying it as a form of nominal relative. There are, however, sound reasons for distinguishing the two types, which I will refrain from going into here!)

    4. CONNECTIVE ADJECTIVES (DETERMINERS)
    The most minor of the 4 categories, 'which' as a connective adjective/determiner can be either an ADNOMINAL RELATIVE or a CONJUNCTIVE.


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    #6

    Re: connector

    Thanks Philo. I am going to go through your post. I could do with a rehearsal on names.

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    #7

    Re: connector



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    #8

    Re: connector

    Quote Originally Posted by omasta View Post
    Hi!

    You can be both! In my country you can find university students who successfully teach in some private language schools.
    Hello Omasta,

    Thanks for your input. I highly doubt this is the mainstream here. I prefer the 'officially-approved', as opposed to the 'based on subjective judgment', in the definition for 'teacher'.

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    #9

    Re: connector

    Hello Kondorosi,

    I write 'I am not a teacher' for the case I will make a mistake. In France, we have teachers and students.

    I am just a learner, just like you I believe.

    See you soon on the forum.


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    #10

    Re: connector

    Hi Philo,

    I have (quite) a few questions and I would like you to answer them. I hope I do not impose on you too much with them.

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    Connectors are a large group of words that serve to join words, phrases or entire sentences. They comprise members of 4 main form-classes:

    1. CONJUNCTIONS
    Although most typically linking clauses, these can connect even simple substantive phrases, as 'and' in 'between you and me'. They consist of two sub-classes, coordinators (and, but, or, etc.) and subordinators (while, because, although, etc.)
    So far so good.

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    2. CONNECTIVE ADVERBS
    These can, in turn, be of a number of kinds:

    2a. ADNOMINAL RELATIVE ADVERBS
    e.g. 'when' in

    This was the day when his life changed.
    Do you mean by 'in turn' that a connective adverb in a sentence belong to only one of the sub-categories? In another sentence, the same connective adverb, however, may belong to another sub-group. Am I right?

    Regarding the sentence in 2.a., 'when' is an adverb that is attached to the verb 'changed', and the subordinate clause serves to identify the 'day'. Which day? The sub-clause is adjectival (=adnominal?).

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    2b. NOMINAL RELATIVE ADVERBS
    e.g. 'where' in

    This is where I was standing when the accident occurred.
    'who', 'that', 'which' do not belong here, right? They belong to connective pronouns. In the sentence, the predicate nominative is introduced by an adverb. In the term nominal relative adverb, the bolded words refer to the bolded words in the previous sentence, right? Relative means 'where' refers back to 'this', a noun. An adverb and a noun have the same referent. Odd. Can I say with some justification that the nominal clause is a complementizer?


    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    2c. ADVERBIAL CONJUNCTS
    These are words like 'however' and 'therefore' which chiefly provide a semantic link between separate sentences, but are often used like coordinators to link coordinate clauses within the same sentence.
    Quite straightforward.

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    2d. CONJUNCTIVE ADVERBS
    (N.B. despite apparent similarity of name to 2c, quite different!)
    These are canonically interrogative adverbs (when, where, why, how) used to introduce an embedded, or indirect, question, e.g. 'why' in

    He asked why I had done it.


    (They include all adverbs than can function as interrogatives except for forms in '-ever'.)
    Okay.

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    3. CONNECTIVE PRONOUNS
    Similarly divided into RELATIVE (adnominal & nominal) and CONJUNCTIVE

    (N.B. Some grammarians do not recognize the category of conjunctive pronoun, simply classifying it as a form of nominal relative. There are, however, sound reasons for distinguishing the two types, which I will refrain from going into here!)
    If I get it right, these grammarians put relative adverbs and relative pronouns into the same set.
    He asked me who he was. -- Conjunctive connective pronoun?
    He is the man who I am not. -- adnominal connective pronoun?
    He is who I am not. -- nominal connective pronoun?

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    4. CONNECTIVE ADJECTIVES (DETERMINERS)
    The most minor of the 4 categories, 'which' as a connective adjective/determiner can be either an ADNOMINAL RELATIVE or a CONJUNCTIVE.
    This is the house of which window has been broken. -- Is this 'which' a connective adjective?
    Last edited by Kondorosi; 11-Dec-2009 at 20:01.

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