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      • Native Language:
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    #1

    grammar for the file name of a Word document

    Hi,

    Question:
    Which file name of a word document is more common for my resume?


    Sentence1:
    Uktous's resume to apply for a Trainee Accountant position.doc

    Sentence2:
    Uktous's resume for the application for a Trainee Accountant position.doc


    Thanks

    • Member Info
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    #2

    Re: grammar for the file name of a Word document

    What difference does it make? It's a filename. Call it resume.doc or whatever is convenient.


    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 576
    #3

    Re: grammar for the file name of a Word document

    If you are planning to send the resume as an email attachment then something like resume.doc is fine, or perhaps Your Name - Resume.doc.

    The rest of the information you were saying ("application for X position") would be included either in a cover letter, or in the email itself. The employer you send it to will probably change the file name to something that suits their own file management system.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • American English
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    • Join Date: Mar 2007
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    #4

    Re: grammar for the file name of a Word document

    Absolutely - never try to make your file name a sentence. Some systems have problem with spaces and using punctuation is asking for trouble. (Most have the space issue figured out by now, thank goodness.)

    Uktous_resume_accounting.doc is more than enough.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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