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  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • German
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      • Germany
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    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #1

    2 linked verbs

    Hello,
    I have problems to use linked verbs correctly.
    Some examples:

    It's not smart to give away your car.
    It's not smart to give your car away.

    Shoot down its shield!
    Shoot its shield down!

    Just pick up the item.
    Just pick the item up.

    Get off your transporter, you're blocking me!
    Get your
    transporter off, you're blocking me!
    (Maybe get off is not good in this sentence either way.)

    Would you please turn off the light when you leave the room?
    Would you please turn the light off when you leave the room?

    I will write down your information.
    I will write your information down.


    There are in fact many more examples, but maybe there is a simple rule?

    Cheers!

    • Member Info
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      • Oriya
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      • India
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    #2

    Exclamation Re: 2 linked verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Hello,
    I have problems to use linked verbs correctly.
    Some examples:
    It's not smart to give away your car. (Transitive and separable; meaning: to give as a present)
    It's not smart to give your car away.

    Shoot down its shield! (Transitive but inseparable; meaning: to cause to fall by hitting with a shot)
    Shoot its shield down!

    Just pick up the item. (Transitive and separable; means: arrange to meet someone and give her/him a ride)
    Just pick the item up.
    Get off your transporter, you're blocking me! (Transitive but inseparable; means: leave a large, closed vehicle) Get your transporter off, you're blocking me!
    (Maybe get off is not good in this sentence either way.)

    Would you please turn off the light when you leave the room? (Transitive and separable; means: stop by turning a handle or switch)
    Would you please turn the light off when you leave the room?

    I will write down your information. (Transitive and separable; meaning: record something in writing)
    I will write your information down.


    There are in fact many more examples, but maybe there is a simple rule?

    Cheers!
    I think you have mistaken phrasal verb as 2 linked verbs. So here is a brief on phrasal verb:
    A phrasal verb is a verb plus a preposition or adverb (as: look up, bring around)which gives a meaning different from the original verb. Some phrasal verbs are transitive and others intransitive. An intransitive verb cannot be followed by an object but a transitive verb can. Some (not all) transitive phrasal verbs are separable. In such cases the object is placed between the verb and the preposition or after the preposition if the object is not a pronoun. When the transitive phrasal verb is inseparable, the object is placed after the preposition


    The example sentences have been analyzed taking the above points in view.
    Last edited by sarat_106; 15-Dec-2009 at 09:37.

  2. Nightmare85's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,333
    #3

    Re: 2 linked verbs

    Hello and thank you!

    Oh, you're right.
    Of course they are not 2 verbs.
    (I guess I was too tired )

    I think there is no simple rule, I must learn it.
    (Learning which are transitive and which are not.)

    Cheers!

  3. syku's Avatar
    Junior Member
    Interested in Language
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    #4

    Re: 2 linked verbs

    None of your examples are truly inseparable.
    "An enemy plane! Shoot it down!"
    "Get your hand off me!"
    They behave like the words you're familiar with -- "anfangen", "eintreffen"...

    Inseparable phrasal verbs include "account for", "depend on"... (but "abhängen" is separable). They are as inseparable as the words, "bekommen", "verlassen"...

    As a general rule, if the phrasal verb is separable, separate the main verb and its preposition (or adverb) only when the object is not too long. Thus,
    the sentence "He decided to give all his fortunate accumulated over the years while working as a banker away" sounds much worse in English than in German.

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