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    #1

    let out

    Dear teachers,
    When the flood went down, he sent out a dove.
    Can I use "let out" so there are two sentences:

    1. When the flood went down, he let out a dove.

    2. When the flood went down, he let a dove out.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 966
    #2

    Re: let out

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear teachers,
    When the flood went down, he sent out a dove.
    Can I use "let out" so there are two sentences:

    1. When the flood went down, he let out a dove.

    2. When the flood went down, he let a dove out.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    'let out' is a separable optional phrasal verb. Both are correct.

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    #3

    Re: let out

    Hi Kondorosi,
    Thank you very much for your explanation.
    Could you please kindly explain if "out" a prepostion?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    'let out' is a separable optional phrasal verb. Both are correct.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
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    #4

    Re: let out

    Definitely an adverb particle. Do you know why?


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    #5

    Re: let out

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    Do you know why?
    Others might be interested. The word 'separable' in 'separable pv' means the group of words that follows the particle can also come between the verb and the particle. An object complement cannot precede a preposition. Consequently, separable pv's are not prepositional verbs. Intransitive pv's also have an adverb particle. Intransitive means no object. No object means no preposition. Only with inseparable pv's comes up the dilemma.

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    #6

    Re: let out

    Hi Kondorosi,

    1. When the flood went down, he let out a dove.
    In this sentence "out" is a preposition because it is followed by a noun phrase.
    2. When the flood went down, he let a dove out.
    In this sentence "out" is an adverb because it is notfollowed by a noun phrase.
    Is that right?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    Others might be interested. The word 'separable' in 'separable pv' means the group of words that follows the particle can also come between the verb and the particle. An object complement cannot precede a preposition. Consequently, separable pv's are not prepositional verbs. Intransitive pv's also have an adverb particle. Intransitive means no object. No object means no preposition. Only with inseparable pv's comes up the dilemma.

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