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    #1

    have

    I wonder if there is a subtle difference between "1" and "2".
    1. She had me do all kinds of jobs for her.
    2. She had me doing all kinds of jobs for her.

  1. ha179's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: have

    There is a similar topic on this website: https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...-do-doing.html

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    #3

    Exclamation Re: have

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I wonder if there is a subtle difference between "1" and "2".
    1. She had me do all kinds of jobs for her.
    2. She had me doing all kinds of jobs for her.


    Here had acts as a causative verb. So the basic structure of the sentence should be as:

    Subject + Causative verb+ Agent + Action verb + Object
    She .......... had ............... me .......... (to)do ....... all kinds of jobs for her.

    In this structure the action verb can be infinitive or bare infinitive form. So your second sentence is structurally incorrect.
    Last edited by sarat_106; 17-Dec-2009 at 12:38.


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    #4

    Re: have

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I wonder if there is a subtle difference between "1" and "2".
    1. She had me do all kinds of jobs for her.
    2. She had me doing all kinds of jobs for her.
    Hi!

    I'm not a teacher.

    2. She had me doing all kinds of jobs for her.

    This sentence may mean 'tell somebody to do something' or 'experience an event or action'.
    See: Practical English Usage by Michael Swan, 1992 edition, entry 286/1&2; (have + object + verb-form).

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