Results 1 to 2 of 2
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Dec 2005
    • Posts: 130
    #1

    there be / there have

    (there be / there have)

    1.there is/are/was/were
    2.there have

    Q1.What are the differences between 1 and 2?

    Q2.Please list the usages of there have because I don't know waht are the differences and how to use there have.

    I am confused with these two. My teacher taught me there be. I read some sentences that written there have.

    Ex. There is a party.
    There will be a party.
    There is going to be a party.
    Can I say:
    There have a party.
    There will be a party.

    Thanks in advance.


    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 576
    #2

    Re: there be / there have

    Quote Originally Posted by dido4 View Post
    (there be / there have)

    1.there is/are/was/were
    2.there have

    Q1.What are the differences between 1 and 2?

    Q2.Please list the usages of there have because I don't know waht are the differences and how to use there have.

    I am confused with these two. My teacher taught me there be. I read some sentences that written there have.

    Ex. There is a party.
    There will be a party.
    There is going to be a party.
    Can I say:
    There have a party.
    There will be a party.

    Thanks in advance.
    (Not a teacher)

    I'm not a grammarian, but as far as I'm aware, there is no such thing as 'there have' as a verb.

    You have the verb 'there to be' which can be used in the following tenses:

    Simple Present: There is a party...
    Simple Past: There was a party...
    Simple Future: There will be a party...
    Present Perfect: There has been a party...
    Past perfect: There had been a party...
    Future perfect: There will have been a party...

    Your teacher taught you 'there be' as the infinitive verb. 'There have been' is the present perfect inflection of the verb. This is the same as for the verb 'to be'.

    You will always need 'be' somewhere in the verb, as this is the verb! So, you can't have just 'there have'. 'Have' creates the perfective, and so the past participle of 'be' must be used - been. Thus, 'There have been'.

    Note: 'have' is used for plural nouns, 'has' is used for single/non-count nouns.

    So, to answer about the sentences you gave:

    There have a party. Incorrect. 'There has been a party'
    There will be a party. Correct.

    I hope this is clear now.
    Last edited by Linguist__; 22-Dec-2009 at 11:22.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •