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  1. corgimajor
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    #1

    Daily Telegraph

    I've been debating with members of my family whether the following caption we saw underneath a picture of a passenger waiting at St Pancras for Eurostar Services to resume was grammatically accurate:

    "Bitter blow: a passenger at London St Pancras after freezing weather forced the cancellation of all Eurostar services"

    What do you think?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Daily Telegraph

    Quote Originally Posted by corgimajor View Post
    I've been debating with members of my family whether the following caption we saw underneath a picture of a passenger waiting at St Pancras for Eurostar Services to resume was grammatically accurate:

    "Bitter blow: a passenger at London St Pancras after freezing weather forced the cancellation of all Eurostar services"

    What do you think?
    It looks OK to me.

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    #3

    Re: Daily Telegraph

    Quote Originally Posted by corgimajor View Post
    I've been debating with members of my family whether the following caption we saw underneath a picture of a passenger waiting at St Pancras for Eurostar Services to resume was grammatically accurate:

    "Bitter blow: a passenger at London St Pancras after freezing weather forced the cancellation of all Eurostar services"

    What do you think?
    (NOT a teacher) Could you tell us what aspects of the cutline (caption) were debated among your family members? It looks OK, although I would personally use " 's " after "London" and put a comma after "Pancras."


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    #4

    Re: Daily Telegraph

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    (NOT a teacher) Could you tell us what aspects of the cutline (caption) were debated among your family members? It looks OK, although I would personally use " 's " after "London" and put a comma after "Pancras."
    Thanks for your reply. The debate focused on the caption could be read by the unitiated to mean either the passenger or the freezing weather was the reason for the delay - when in fact it was the freezing weather. I think your suggestion removes this this ambiguity - do you agree?
    Last edited by Corgimajor; 22-Dec-2009 at 23:46. Reason: didn't read earlier post properly!

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    #5

    Re: Daily Telegraph

    Quote Originally Posted by corgimajor View Post
    I've been debating with members of my family whether the following caption we saw underneath a picture of a passenger waiting at St Pancras for Eurostar Services to resume was grammatically accurate:

    "Bitter blow: a passenger at London St Pancras after freezing weather forced the cancellation of all Eurostar services"

    What do you think?
    I guess that if you wanted to erase all ambiguity, you would need something like: A passenger is shown at London's St. Pancras railroad station, after freezing weather forced cancellation of all Eurostar services. Of course, cutlines are kept brief on purpose because of space. I don't think anyone would think the passenger forced the delay. But if you did want to give this idea, maybe something like this would be needed: A passenger, at London's St. Pancras after freezing weather, forced the cancellation of all Eurostar services. It's great that your family debate grammar issues. Hopefully, other posters will add their two cents, too.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Daily Telegraph

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    I guess that if you wanted to erase all ambiguity, you would need something like: A passenger is shown at London's St. Pancras railroad station, after freezing weather forced cancellation of all Eurostar services. Of course, cutlines are kept brief on purpose because of space. I don't think anyone would think the passenger forced the delay. But if you did want to give this idea, maybe something like this would be needed: A passenger, at London's St. Pancras after freezing weather, forced the cancellation of all Eurostar services. It's great that your family debate grammar issues. Hopefully, other posters will add their two cents, too.
    A British newspaper, which "The Telegraph" is, would describe the place as "London St.Pancras", not "London's St.Pancras railroad station".

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Daily Telegraph

    Quote Originally Posted by corgimajor View Post
    I've been debating with members of my family whether the following caption we saw underneath a picture of a passenger waiting at St Pancras for Eurostar Services to resume was grammatically accurate:

    "Bitter blow: a passenger at London St Pancras after freezing weather forced the cancellation of all Eurostar services"

    What do you think?
    Also, be aware that a sentence can be grammatically correct and still be ambiguous. Ambiguity belongs to semantics or pragmatics, not to syntax (grammar).


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    #8

    Re: Daily Telegraph

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Also, be aware that a sentence can be grammatically correct and still be ambiguous. Ambiguity belongs to semantics or pragmatics, not to syntax (grammar).
    Indeed

    The sentence means, as do all captions, "[The picture is of] a passenger at London St...."

    I understand that without this shared knowledge that the caption describes the picture, one could assume that the passenger froze the weather, thus causing the cancellation of Eurostar services.

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