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    #1

    transitive verb --support

    Concerns about the trend are growing too, with some groups warning that growth clinics, while operating within the limits of the law, promise far more than the evidence supports. ---taken from the NYT
    Dear teachers,

    My question is what the object of supports is in the example above. I have looked support up in many dictiornaries and found that it is a transitive verb that is required to be followed by a noun as an object, but the quoted sounds perfectly correct to my ear. Could you clarify it to me? Thanks.


    LQZ


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
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    #2

    Re: transitive verb --support

    Quote Originally Posted by LQZ View Post
    Dear teachers,

    My question is what the object of supports is in the example above. I have looked support up in many dictiornaries and found that it is a transitive verb that is required to be followed by a noun as an object, but the quoted sounds perfectly correct to my ear. Could you clarify it to me? Thanks.


    LQZ
    'supports' is a noun here.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: transitive verb --support

    Concerns about the trend are growing too, with some groups warning that growth clinics, while operating within the limits of the law, promise far more than the evidence supports. ---taken from the NYT
    Firstly, a transitive verb does not have to be followed by an object. It just have to have one. "This is the mouse I killed".

    Clinics promise far more than the evidence supports.
    In your example, the object is implied - results, promises ...

    The evidence supports certain results, promises ...
    The clinics promise far more than this. (far more than the results or promises that the evidence supports).

    • Member Info
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    #4

    Re: transitive verb --support

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Firstly, a transitive verb does not have to be followed by an object. It just have to have one. "This is the mouse I killed".

    Clinics promise far more than the evidence supports.
    In your example, the object is implied - results, promises ...

    The evidence supports certain results, promises ...
    The clinics promise far more than this. (far more than the results or promises that the evidence supports).
    Thanks, I've got it.

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