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    #1

    A Confucius Proverb

    Hello Everyone,

    Confucius, the greatest thinker in about 2000 years ago in ancient China, thinks fame, wealth, high status, and prosperity should be obtained through hard work and legal means. Those from illegal and shamless ways are regarded as humble and fragile by him. Therefore, he raises the following proverbs: 不义富且贵,于我如浮云.

    I have tried to translate the sentence this way: High status and wealth through immoral means are regarded as floating cloud by me.

    浮云( floating cloud) is a metaphor, emphasizing here that positions and prosperity obtained through illegal ways can't last long, which is shameless and worthless, regarded by the author.

    I am wondering here if you can give your opinions here on my translation and if you can present a meaning similar, which suits way of English thinking?

    Regards

    Sky

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    #2

    Re: A Confucius Proverb

    (NOT a teacher) Perhaps a somewhat similar proverb in English is "Ill gotten goods never thrive" or "Ill gotten goods seldom prosper."


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    #3

    Re: A Confucius Proverb

    Hi!

    What about this:

    High status and wealth acquired through immoral means are always under a cloud and don't pay.

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    #4

    Re: A Confucius Proverb

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    (NOT a teacher) Perhaps a somewhat similar proverb in English is "Ill gotten goods never thrive" or "Ill gotten goods seldom prosper."
    What do you mean by "Ill gottern "?

  1. roseriver1012's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: A Confucius Proverb

    if you post this on tianya forum, you may get much better responses.

  2. Offroad's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: A Confucius Proverb

    Quote Originally Posted by sky753 View Post
    What do you mean by "Ill gottern "?
    Ill-gotten:
    Obtained in an evil manner or by dishonest means: ill-gotten gains.

    example:
    what is got over the Devil's back is spent under his belly.

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    #7

    Exclamation Re: A Confucius Proverb

    Quote Originally Posted by sky753 View Post
    Hello Everyone,

    Confucius, the greatest thinker in about 2000 years ago in ancient China, thinks fame, wealth, high status, and prosperity should be obtained through hard work and legal means. Those from illegal and shamless ways are regarded as humble and fragile by him. Therefore, he raises the following proverbs: 不义富且贵,于我如浮云.

    I have tried to translate the sentence this way: High status and wealth through immoral means are regarded as floating cloud by me.

    浮云( floating cloud) is a metaphor, emphasizing here that positions and prosperity obtained through illegal ways can't last long, which is shameless and worthless, regarded by the author.

    I am wondering here if you can give your opinions here on my translation and if you can present a meaning similar, which suits way of English thinking?

    Regards

    Sky
    I have tried to draw a distinction between real/true and unreal/untrue.

    High status and wealth through immoral means are unreal and temporary having no substance but there is no end to real things earned through one's hard labor and sacrifice.
    Last edited by sarat_106; 25-Dec-2009 at 08:03.

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    #8

    Re: A Confucius Proverb

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    (NOT a teacher) Perhaps a somewhat similar proverb in English is "Ill gotten goods never thrive" or "Ill gotten goods seldom prosper."
    ill gotten goods is a proper version for spoken Chinese 不义之财, which can be roughly translated as property obtained through illegal and immoral means! Your sentence, I think, is a good translation for the Chinese proverb!

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