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    #1

    Is comma needed?

    In April, authorities unveiled a billion-dollar blueprint to map out how Singapore can develop in a sustainable manner. By 2030 for example, 80 per cent of buildings here will be energy efficient, and energy consumption will be cut by one third.

    Should there be a comma before 'for'? By 2030, for example, 80 per cent...

    Many thanks.

  1. kfredson's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: Is comma needed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    In April, authorities unveiled a billion-dollar blueprint to map out how Singapore can develop in a sustainable manner. By 2030 for example, 80 per cent of buildings here will be energy efficient, and energy consumption will be cut by one third.

    Should there be a comma before 'for'? By 2030, for example, 80 per cent...

    Many thanks.
    Yes.

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    #3

    Re: Is comma needed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    In April, authorities unveiled a billion-dollar blueprint to map out how Singapore can develop in a sustainable manner. By 2030 for example, 80 per cent of the buildings here will be energy efficient, and energy consumption will be cut by one third.

    Should there be a comma before 'for'? By 2030, for example, 80 per cent...
    I would not put a comma there. "By 2030 for example" is one thought/phrase.


    "Yes." should not have a capital letter or a period. It's just a single word, not a sentence.
    Many thanks.
    2006

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    #4

    Re: Is comma needed?

    1. I think Kfredson is right in writing 'Yes' with a capital and ending it with a full-stop. I believe a word can be a sentence.

    Could some member confirm whether my thinking is in the correct track?

    2. I would appreciate it very much if other members let me know what you have been taught as regards the following which I posted earler:

    In April, authorities unveiled a billion-dollar blueprint to map out how Singapore can develop in a sustainable manner. By 2030 for example, 80 per cent of buildings here will be energy efficient, and energy consumption will be cut by one third.

    Should there be a comma before 'for'? By 2030, for example, 80 per cent...

    Kfredson said a comma is needed, whereas 2006 says it isn't.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Is comma needed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    1. I think Kfredson is right in writing 'Yes' with a capital and ending it with a full-stop. I believe a word can be a sentence.

    Could some member confirm whether my thinking is in the correct track?

    2. I would appreciate it very much if other members let me know what you have been taught as regards the following which I posted earler:

    In April, authorities unveiled a billion-dollar blueprint to map out how Singapore can develop in a sustainable manner. By 2030 for example, 80 per cent of buildings here will be energy efficient, and energy consumption will be cut by one third.

    Should there be a comma before 'for'? By 2030, for example, 80 per cent...

    Kfredson said a comma is needed, whereas 2006 says it isn't.

    Thanks in advance.
    I would put the comma. I would remove the comma after"efficient" though.

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    #6

    Re: Is comma needed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    In April, authorities unveiled a billion-dollar blueprint to map out how Singapore can develop in a sustainable manner. By 2030 for example, 80 per cent of buildings here will be energy efficient, and energy consumption will be cut by one third.

    Should there be a comma before 'for'? By 2030, for example, 80 per cent...

    Many thanks.
    (NOT a teacher) My humble contribution: By 2030, for example, 80 per cent of buildings here will be energy efficient, and energy consumption will be cut by one third. I respectfully suggest that "Yes." can be considered a "sentence."

  3. Sensible's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Is comma needed?

    I would put the comma. I would remove the comma after "efficient" though.
    Agreed.

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    #8

    Re: Is comma needed?

    1...It's interesting that none of the people who think there should be a comma after "2030" said why there should be one.
    You can't just look at the sentence and think that 'It looks like there should be a comma there.' You have to pay careful attention to the meaning of the sentence.



    You have to consider why the writer didn't put a comma there. Was (s)he just wrong, or did (s)he deliberately and for good reason not put a comma there?
    Will adding a coma after "2030" change the meaning of the sentence?

    What follows is my interpretation of the sentence the writer wrote.

    "By 2030 for example, 80 per cent..." is correct. This addresses only one example relating to 2030. And there may only be one example relating to 2030. Anyway, the writer is not suggesting there is another example relating to 2030.
    So the writer's sentence has the same meaning as 'For example, by 2030 80 per cent...'.

    On the other hand, 'By 2030, for example, 80 percent...'. strongly suggests that there is more than one example relating to 2030.
    So I think the meaning changes with the extra comma.

    2...Can "Yes." be considered a sentence?

    Rarely a single word can be a sentence; examples are 'Stop!' and 'Go.'
    The subject 'You' is understood and only the predicate is written.

    But the word yes is not a sentence. If it were, words like maybe, possibly and sometimes would be sentences too, and I don't think they are.

    I can accept the exclamation 'yes!' as an answer. (with an exclamation mark but with no capital)

    And that's the way I see it!
    Last edited by 2006; 26-Dec-2009 at 23:10. Reason: spelling error


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    #9

    Re: Is comma needed?

    Hi!

    I agree with kfredson that the answer 'Yes.' should be capitalized and considered as a sentence. In my opinion the kfredson's 'Yes.' is an equivalent of the full reply, which is a sentence, to the question "Should there be a comma before 'for'?".

    "Should there be a comma before 'for'?"
    "Yes, there should be a comma."

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    #10

    Re: Is comma needed?

    Quote Originally Posted by omasta View Post
    Hi!

    I agree with kfredson that the answer 'Yes.' should be capitalized and considered as a sentence. In my opinion the kfredson's 'Yes.' is an equivalent of the full reply, which is a sentence, to the question "Should there be a comma before 'for'?".

    "Should there be a comma before 'for'?"
    "Yes, there should be a comma. Then why do you think the writer of the sentence didn't put a comma there?
    Is it because his/her English is not as good as yours?


    "
    2006

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