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    #1

    kind of, hurt and ache, except, over

    Dear teachers,

    I have four questions to ask:

    No.1
    They would be given some kind of a job after they graduated from a university.
    I have learned the expression "kind of" which means "to some extent". My question is "What does this 'some' mean here"?
    No.2
    Exaple: My nose hurt terribly".
    But in the next sentence:
    My eyes were still___ when I went to bed.
    a. hurting b. aching
    The key is "b". Could you please explain why "a" isn't correct? And can I replace "hurt" in "ached" in my first example?

    No.3
    Except Mary the whole calss truned up for the hiking.
    Can I also use "except for" here?

    No.4
    He kicked the ball hard and it rolled across the lawn before hitting the goalpost.
    Can I replace "across" with "over" ?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.
    Jiang

  1. DougLewis's Avatar

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 41
    #2

    Re: kind of, hurt and ache, except, over

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear teachers,

    I have four questions to ask:

    No.1
    They would be given some kind of a job after they graduated from a university.

    I have learned the expression "kind of" which means "to some extent". My question is "What does this 'some' mean here"?

    No.2

    Exaple: My nose hurt terribly".
    But in the next sentence:

    My eyes were still___ when I went to bed.
    a. hurting b. aching

    The key is "b". Could you please explain why "a" isn't correct? And can I replace "hurt" in "ached" in my first example?

    No.3
    Except Mary the whole calss truned up for the hiking.
    Can I also use "except for" here?

    No.4
    He kicked the ball hard and it rolled across the lawn before hitting the goalpost.
    Can I replace "across" with "over" ?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.
    Jiang
    1. - An unspecified job.

    2. - Hurting, aching are interchangeable in the example.

    Ache is usually reserved for a particular kind of pain usually associated with a medical condition such as tooth ache or muscle or joint ache.

    3. - "Except for" is better.

    4. - "Across" is better than "over" in this case.

  2. kfredson's Avatar

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 700
    #3

    Re: kind of, hurt and ache, except, over

    Quote Originally Posted by DougLewis View Post
    1. - An unspecified job.

    2. - Hurting, aching are interchangeable in the example.

    Ache is usually reserved for a particular kind of pain usually associated with a medical condition such as tooth ache or muscle or joint ache.

    3. - "Except for" is better.

    4. - "Across" is better than "over" in this case.
    Yes, I fully agree.

    In number one I believe the writer is misunderstanding "kind" in this sentence:
    "They would be given some kind of a job after they graduated from a university."

    Here the author is not using "kind of" in the sense of "to some extent." That usage is in any sense colloquial and more common to spoken rather than written English.

    The author of the sentence actually is say "some kind" in the sense of "some manner," "some type" or "some form." "Some kind of a" actually modifies job. He might have simply written:
    "They would be given a job." He wants to emphasize that the nature of the job is not yet clear, so instead he wrote:
    "They would be given some kind of a job."

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    #4

    Re: kind of, hurt and ache, except, over

    Dear DougLewis,
    Thank you very much for your explanation. "ache" and "hurt' are confusing. Please read the next sentence:

    The doctor said the injection wouldn't hurt much.
    Can I replace "hurt" with "ache" in this sentence?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.
    Jiang

    Quote Originally Posted by DougLewis View Post
    1. - An unspecified job.

    2. - Hurting, aching are interchangeable in the example.

    Ache is usually reserved for a particular kind of pain usually associated with a medical condition such as tooth ache or muscle or joint ache.

    3. - "Except for" is better.

    4. - "Across" is better than "over" in this case.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: kind of, hurt and ache, except, over

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear DougLewis,
    Thank you very much for your explanation. "ache" and "hurt' are confusing. Please read the next sentence:

    The doctor said the injection wouldn't hurt much.
    Can I replace "hurt" with "ache" in this sentence?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.
    Jiang
    No, "ache" is not appropriate in that situation.

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    #6

    Re: kind of, hurt and ache, except, over

    Dear bhaisahab,
    Thank you very much for your reply. Could you please explain why it is not appropriate in that situation?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    No, "ache" is not appropriate in that situation.

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: kind of, hurt and ache, except, over

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear bhaisahab,
    Thank you very much for your reply. Could you please explain why it is not appropriate in that situation?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    "Ache" is continuous pain, you can't "ache" someone but you can "hurt" someone, which could result in them having an ache.

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