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      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
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      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 529
    #1

    the difference between with and without "it"

    Hi


    Question:

    Does my understanding for sentence 1 and 2 correct?

    Sentence1:
    I believe that your company can offer good training and that it will grow.
    Sentence2:
    I believe that your company can offer good training and that will grow.



    Understanding for sentence1:
    I believe 2 things which are “good training and company growth”.
    Those 2 things have no relationship.


    Understanding for sentence2:
    I believe 2 things which are “good training and company growth”.
    Those 2 things have relationship.
    Ie, there is good training for employee, so well-trained employee lead to company growth.


    Thanks


    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 576
    #2

    Re: the difference between with and without "it"

    Quote Originally Posted by uktous View Post
    Hi


    Question:

    Does my understanding for sentence 1 and 2 correct?

    Sentence1:
    I believe that your company can offer good training and that it will grow.
    Sentence2:
    I believe that your company can offer good training and that will grow.



    Understanding for sentence1:
    I believe 2 things which are “good training and company growth”.
    Those 2 things have no relationship.


    Understanding for sentence2:
    I believe 2 things which are “good training and company growth”.
    Those 2 things have relationship.
    Ie, there is good training for employee, so well-trained employee lead to company growth.


    Thanks
    (Not a teacher)

    It's quite ambiguous. The first could mean either 'I believe that your company can offer good training, and I believe that your company will grow', or it could mean 'I believe that your company can offer good training, and I believe that your company's ability to offer good training will grow'.

    The second could mean two things two; either one of the same meanings as the firsty - 'I believe that your company can offer good training, and I believe that your company's ability to offer good training will grow', but also 'and that' could be referring back to the speakers belief, that is, 'I believe that your company can offer good training, and that belief will grow.'

    If this is a sentence that you want to write, then it would be best to avoid ambiguity, and replace the pronoun 'that' or 'it' with what you are referring to.

    For example, if the meaning you want to convey is 'there is good training for employee, so well-trained employee lead to company growth.' then something like:

    I believe that your company offers good training for it's employees, and this training may lead to company growth.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #3

    Re: the difference between with and without "it"

    Quote Originally Posted by uktous View Post
    Hi


    Sentence2:
    I believe that your company can offer good training and that will grow.


    Understanding for sentence2:
    I believe 2 things which are “good training and company growth”.
    Those 2 things have relationship.
    Ie, there is good training for employee, so well-trained employee lead to company growth.


    Thanks
    No, the second sentence is not grammatical if you intend that meaning.

    The only way it's grammatical is if "that" refers to the good opportunities for training and those opportunities for training will continue to increase.

    If you mean "well-trained employee lead to company growth" then you need to say something like "I believe your company offers excellent opportunities for training, which will, in turn, lead to the company's growth."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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