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    #1

    "far from"

    It is far from true.
    It is far from the truth.

    I have seen both sentences.

    "true" is adj but "the truth" is noun.

    Is "far from" a preposition or adv.?

    can i use both adj or noun after "far from" ? why?

    thank you

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    #2

    Re: "far from"

    'far' is an adjective and 'from' is a preposition.

    'true' can sometimes be used as a noun according to dictionary.com, so in the phrase 'it is far from X' X seems to always be a noun. For example,

    'It is far from large.' doesn't sound very natural to me (a native speaker). It is understandable though.

    I recommend always using a noun in this particular phrase.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "far from"

    Quote Originally Posted by kelvin123 View Post
    It is far from true.
    It is far from the truth.

    I have seen both sentences.

    "true" is adj but "the truth" is noun.

    Is "far from" a preposition or adv.?

    can i use both adj or noun after "far from" ? why?

    thank you
    I don't think "It's far from true" is grammatical, unless you postulate that there is an elided "being" - "It is far from being true".

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    #4

    Re: "far from"

    The situation is far from good.
    It is far from tolerable.
    The result is far from important.

    Then can I write those sentences correctly since i suppose that the word "being" is omitted?

    by the way ,when can we omit the word "being"?
    Last edited by kelvin123; 05-Jan-2010 at 15:59.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "far from"

    Quote Originally Posted by kelvin123 View Post
    The situation is far from good.
    It is far from tolerable.
    The result is far from important.

    Then can I write those sentences correctly since i suppose that the word "being" is omitted?
    Yes, they are colloquial, and certainly understandable.
    by the way ,when can we omit the word "being"?
    When you write sentences such as the above.

    In fact, I'm not completely sure of the grammar, but the usage is acceptable.
    It is far from tolerable. "far from" could be considered an adverbial component, modifying 'tolerable', as in "It is almost tolerable", where 'almost' is an adverb.
    "It is almost tolerable" = "It is close to (being) tolerable"

    Other similar phrases: (I would insert 'being' where shown).
    It is next to impossible.
    She is as close to perfect as a girl could be.
    Your essay is miles away from (being) acceptable.
    This is nowhere near good enough.


    Maybe another native speaker can clarify the grammar.

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    #6

    Re: "far from"

    Can others help me?
    thanks

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    #7

    Re: "far from"

    Quote Originally Posted by kelvin123 View Post
    Can others help me?
    thanks
    ***NOT A TEACHER*** One of my dictionaries gives this sentence: He seems far from content. It classifies "far" in this sentence as an "adverb" that "is used with 'from.' " Thus, as another poster suggested, "far from" can be considered an adverb modifying the adjective = He seems not at all content. In the case of "It is far from the truth," one might say "far" is an adjective modified by the prepositional phrase.

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    #8

    Re: "far from"

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    In the case of "It is far from the truth," one might say "far" is an adjective modified by the prepositional phrase.
    Good example that you found.

    But I'm not sure I agree on this point. To illustrate, I'll use '-ly' as an adverb marker.
    A: It is far.
    B: How far is it?
    A: It's [from the truthly] far.
    Ignoring that this isn't English, if it were it would mean "It's so far that it's not true".

    But the meaning is: "It is far[ly] from the truth" (also not English), where "from the truth" is adjectival and "far[ly]" is an adverb.
    A: It's from the truth. [It is untrue (from = away from)].
    B: Much?
    A: It's far[ly] from the truth.

    That is, 'far' modifies 'from the truth', not vice versa, as I see it.

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    #9

    Re: "far from"

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Good example that you found.

    But I'm not sure I agree on this point. To illustrate, I'll use '-ly' as an adverb marker.
    A: It is far.
    B: How far is it?
    A: It's [from the truthly] far.
    Ignoring that this isn't English, if it were it would mean "It's so far that it's not true".

    But the meaning is: "It is far[ly] from the truth" (also not English), where "from the truth" is adjectival and "far[ly]" is an adverb.
    A: It's from the truth. [It is untrue (from = away from)].
    B: Much?
    A: It's far[ly] from the truth.

    That is, 'far' modifies 'from the truth', not vice versa, as I see it.
    ***NOT A TEACHER***Excellent point. I hope that people who understand grammar better than I will give their opinions on your theory. I am eager to hear what they say. I can't find anything "authoritative" on this relatively "unimportant" topic.

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    #10

    Re: "far from"

    If anyone is still interested in this topic, you may want to know what someone who knows grammar VERY well told me: just consider "far from" as an adverb. Therefore: (1) He is honest. He is FAR FROM honest. (2) It is the truth. It is FAR FROM the truth.

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