Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,333
    #1

    absolutely

    Hello,
    Most times I always read the word absolutely.
    However, I almost never read absolute.

    Q: Do you think this makes sense?
    A1: Absolutely!

    A2: Absolutely not!

    Absolutely amateur.

    Sorry, right now I don't have better ideas
    There are plenty of other examples.

    What's wrong with absolute?
    Isn't it as common as absolutely?


    And yes, I know what an adverb is, but in these examples there is no need of an adverb.

    Cheers!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Nov 2008
    • Posts: 1,032
    #2

    Re: absolutely

    Is there an absolute answer to this question?

  2. euncu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey

    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,314
    #3

    Re: absolutely

    When one says "absolutely" he/she means something like "definitely" , "entirely" or "completely".

    Absolute means that something is not relative, it has its own existence.In this sense the word is applied the abstract things mostly.

    Sometimes it can define something that is not comparable. For example,"He has an absolute power (over his foes)"

  3. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,104
    #4

    Re: absolutely

    Quote Originally Posted by euncu View Post
    When one says "absolutely" he/she means something like "definitely" , "entirely" or "completely".

    Absolute means that something is not relative, it has its own existence.In this sense the word is applied the abstract things mostly.

    Sometimes it can define something that is not comparable. For example,"He has an absolute power (over his foes)"
    No. That is what it used to mean in most cases. It still does when comparing relative things to absolute things.
    However, these days it usually means "Yes" (with some sort of breathless enthusiasm behind it).
    This is an export from America in the last 10-15 years.
    Is it annoying? Absolutely!

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] Absolutely True
    By anupumh in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Sep-2009, 21:44
  2. Absolutely!
    By bluepinky in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 20-Jun-2009, 10:12
  3. Help!! My students get absolutely bored!
    By petebrown in forum Teaching English
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 16-Aug-2008, 12:56
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-Jan-2008, 19:13
  5. 'Absolutely'
    By Tdol in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 27-Nov-2003, 01:00

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •