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    #1

    It reminds me of something

    Let us put this sentence under a microscope. The verb 'reminds', it is a mental verb, right? 'me' looks like the direct object. In grammar books you can read the direct object is the thing that receives the action named by the verb. What does 'me' receive here? 'Remind' is a mental process. You do the reminding at the instigation of 'it'. 'me' receives the instigation? It affects me. Maybe this sentence helps us see the analogy. Okay. Now we have another constituent in the sentence: 'of something'. What is that? We have in this sentence a subject (it = doer) that instigates my mental process that I do and that affects me.

    It reminds me of something. How is something involved in this whole kit and caboodle? What does it do or what does it get? I do the reminding and the output of my reminding is the something.

    Conclusions:

    It = S; instigator
    reminds = V; this is what 'me' does (causative structure?)
    me = doer of reminding
    of something = prepositional indirect object; something receives my cognitive process that has been instigated by 'It'.

    Do you think I am right? It is tricky, isn't it?

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    #2

    Re: It reminds me of something

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    Let us put this sentence under a microscope. The verb 'reminds', it is a mental verb, right? 'me' looks like the direct object. In grammar books you can read the direct object is the thing that receives the action named by the verb. What does 'me' receive here? 'Remind' is a mental process. You do the reminding at the instigation of 'it'. 'me' receives the instigation? It affects me. Maybe this sentence helps us see the analogy. Okay. Now we have another constituent in the sentence: 'of something'. What is that? We have in this sentence a subject (it = doer) that instigates my mental process that I do and that affects me.

    It reminds me of something. How is something involved in this whole kit and caboodle? What does it do or what does it get? I do the reminding and the output of my reminding is the something.

    Conclusions:

    It = S; instigator
    reminds = V; this is what 'me' does (causative structure?)
    me = doer of reminding
    of something = prepositional indirect object; something receives my cognitive process that has been instigated by 'It'.

    Do you think I am right? It is tricky, isn't it?
    OK, I'll bite.
    You know I haven't already reached your level of language analysis Kondorosi, but let us give it a try.
    For me this sentence really looks simple:
    It -> subject (usually it refers to a fact implicit in the conversation: "This fact reminds me ...", "This theme/subject reminds me ...", "Something reminds me ...", "This beautiful equation reminds me ..."
    reminds -> transitiv verb
    of something -> prepositional indirect object
    something -> object of the preposition "of"

    I confess I will read your post above some more times, but I can't see any problem in the sentence. I can't talk about diagramming sentences, I still do not know that technique -- the only book I read about grammar (English gramar for dummies) said we could live without it.

    Not a native speaker

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    #3

    Re: It reminds me of something

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    What does 'me' receive here? 'Remind' is a mental process.
    "Me" receives the "action" of the verb "remind." Put it in the passive and it becomes clearer: I am reminded (by sucha and such thing).


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    #4

    Re: It reminds me of something

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    OK, I'll bite.
    You know I haven't already reached your level of language analysis Kondorosi, but let us give it a try.
    I am not sure about that. Anyway, I am the one who does not look a gift horse in the mouth.


    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    I can't talk about diagramming sentences, I still do not know that technique
    You can learn the tricks in just a couple of hours. The lion's share of diagramming is to realize the mechanics of grammar. It is just a simple language that has not got more than 30 'words'. You communicate more quickly by them because your eyes can process info more quickly than your tongue can lash and my ear can hear.

    How would you convince an eager student that we have an indirect object in the sentence?


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    #5

    Re: It reminds me of something

    Something occured to me: What if I paraphrase the sentence?

    It forced me to think of him.

    forced to think = remind
    I can see better the Od now. How could I aptly lure the Oi out of its shell?
    I need to think further. Meanwhile I am off to get a bite to eat.

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    #6

    Re: It reminds me of something

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    Something occured to me: What if I paraphrase the sentence?

    It forced me to think of him.

    forced to think = remind
    I can see better the Od now. How could I aptly lure the Oi out of its shell?
    I need to think further. Meanwhile I am off to get a bite to eat.
    You are forcing me to enter the wild without convenient weapons. Let us see:

    It --> that same subject of the former sentence.
    forced --> again a transitive verb
    me --> direct object
    to think of him --> prepositional indirect object

    It forced who? "Me" that is the direct object
    to what ? "to think of me" thats the (prepositional) indirect object

    I know some people do not consider prepositonal objects as indirect objects, but that is not important here.

    The original sentence was "It reminds me of something." The indirect object 'something' can be anything:
    It reminds me of thinking about him.
    It reminds me of the fact that everybody should study English grammar.


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    #7

    Re: It reminds me of something

    It forced me to think of him

    it = S
    forced = V
    me = Od
    to think of him = objective complement

    It did not really force me. It forced me to think of him. The Oc completes the meaning of the receiver of the forcing. How interesting, you substitute 'remind' for 'force to think' (a word combination that is not cohesive syntactically) and the Oc disappears.

    I think the indirect object in the rephrased original sentence has been glaring us in the face from the beginning.

    It forced me to think of him.

    'me' is to 'force' as 'cake' is to 'bake'. 'him' in 'of him' is to 'force' as 'her' in 'Baked a cake for her' is to 'bake'. Indirect object.

    The thinking is given to 'something'. 'me' receives the causative action named by 'remind'. What do you think?

    Obrigada.

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    #8

    Re: It reminds me of something

    If I had to analyse this sentence, I'd say that 'me' is the indirect object and 'of something' the direct one.


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    #9

    Re: It reminds me of something

    Quote Originally Posted by mara_ce View Post
    I'd say that 'me' is the indirect object and 'of something' the direct one.
    Why?


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    #10

    Re: It reminds me of something

    'I baked a cake for her. -- 'her' receives the direct object
    It reminds me of something. -- 'something' does not receive me

    I am starting to think that the prepositional object complements 'me'. There is no indirect object. The sentence is a SVOC.

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