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  1. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 4
    #1

    Smile Tell me the difference...

    Hi sir! How're you doing? I need you to help me in understanding the difference between INTERROGATIVE ADJECTIVE and INTERROGATIVE PRONOUN. I am sure that you will detail me about the question put above.
    Thanking you in anticipation
    Newbie
    Azhar

  2. mara_ce's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Argentina
      • Current Location:
      • Argentina

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 6,067
    #2

    Re: Tell me the difference...

    Hi azeegum,

    The interrogative pronouns are: who, whom, whose, what and which. They have nominal functions:

    1)Subject:
    Who opened my letter? (who: subject; opened my letter: predicate)

    When the wh-element is the subject it is immediately followed by the finite or conjugated verb, and there is no inversion of order.

    2)Direct object:
    Who (or whom) did you see? (you: subject; who did see: predicate; who/whom: direct object)

    3)Indirect object (introduced by the preposition to):
    Who did you give the present to? (you: subject; who to: indirect object)

    4)Objet to the preposition:
    With whom did you go? / Who did you go with? (with: preposition; whom/who: object to the preposition)

    5)Subjective complement:
    Whose is that book? (that book: subject; whose: subjective complement)

    6)Objective complement:
    What did they make him? (what: objective complement; him: direct object)

    The interrogative adjectives are: whose, what and which. They have an adjectival function.

    Which books have you lent him? (you: subject; which books: direct object)

    The direct object is a noun phrase (which books). Within the noun phrase, ‘books’ functions as the Head (the most important word) and ‘which’ pre-modifies books. ‘Which’ is an interrogative adjective.

    Whose antiques are these? (these: subject; whose antiques: subjective complement, noun phrase)

    Note:
    Which (pronoun and adjective) is used instead of ‘who and what’ when the choice is restricted.
    What will you have to drink? (general inquiry)
    There’s whisky, gin and sherry; which will you have? (restricted choice)

  3. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 4
    #3

    Re: Tell me the difference...

    Thanks for such valuable information. It's really knowledgeable on your part.
    Thanks again.
    keep at such work.
    I hope to come back again with some other question - I don't have enough time to use net these days. It's been hectic for me for many weeks.
    Stay in touch.
    Newbie
    Azhar Ali

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