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    #1

    A problem with 'taking a photo'.

    How do you say in English, when you take a photo of someone and this photo is possible to be taken either for the sake of/to be held by the subject or the object? ( with the expression ' to take a photo', not the verb ' to photograph').
    I mean the representation of dative in such a case.

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    #2

    Re: A problem with 'taking a photo'.

    Hello Yourek,

    Would "to take a photo for someone" be the phrase you're looking for?

    MrP

    Not a professional ESL teacher.

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    #3

    Re: A problem with 'taking a photo'.

    Thank you MrP

    This phrase restricts the result to the object, I'm afraid. My problem is to find an expression that respects both an object's and a subject's right to that
    photo. To excuse myself: a proper phrase in Polish has inspired me to ask about it.

    Yourek

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    #4

    Re: A problem with 'taking a photo'.

    Quote Originally Posted by yourek View Post
    Thank you MrP

    This phrase restricts the result to the object, I'm afraid. My problem is to find an expression that respects both an object's and a subject's right to that
    photo. To excuse myself: a proper phrase in Polish has inspired me to ask about it.

    Yourek
    I tried hard to understand your two posts unsuccessfully. I really can't get what you are saying.

    Suggestions: 1) write your proper Polish phrase in the google translator (Google Translate) and write here the output. Perhaps with this output we can help you. 2) Try to explain your point better here. I am sure there are many other members willing to help you. 3) Try the other languages forum, maybe someone who know Polish and English can help you.

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    #5

    Re: A problem with 'taking a photo'.

    I agree that the original Polish phrase might help.

    It's possible that a similarly ambiguous wording doesn't exist in English, though.

    All the best,

    MrP

    Not a professional ESL teacher.

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    #6

    Re: A problem with 'taking a photo'.

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    I tried hard to understand your two posts unsuccessfully. I really can't get what you are saying.

    Suggestions: 1) write your proper Polish phrase in the google translator (Google Translate) and write here the output. Perhaps with this output we can help you. 2) Try to explain your point better here. I am sure there are many other members willing to help you. 3) Try the other languages forum, maybe someone who know Polish and English can help you.
    I agree with you that I am not quite clear. A few days let me see it. I wondered whether it is possible to have both 'photo of' and 'photo for' in the same relatively simple phrase.
    Additionally, my clue with a dative was misleading.
    And moreover, I made a transgression from Polish, because we 'make photos' in our language, not 'take them'. In English, you always TAKE your photo, so the phrase MrP presented finally has satisfied me.
    The Polish phrase is "Zrobił zdjęcia Jankowi" (He took a photoes of John/ for John)
    Let me stop beating around the bush and thank you all.

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    #7

    Re: A problem with 'taking a photo'.

    So the person will do two things: He will take a picture of John (John is the person in the picture). Then he will give that photo to John.

    Is that right?

    I don't think we have such a word.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #8

    Re: A problem with 'taking a photo'.

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    So the person will do two things: He will take a picture of John (John is the person in the picture). Then he will give that photo to John.

    Is that right?

    I don't think we have such a word.
    Yes, that's right.
    A slight difference is that he rather MAY give it to John.

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    #9

    Re: A problem with 'taking a photo'.

    I wonder whether this structure would suit your context:

    1. He took Jim's picture for him.

    For instance, if I am a tourist, and I want you to take a picture of me in front of the Taj Mahal, I hand you my camera and ask you "to take my picture for me":

    2. I asked Yourek to take my picture for me in front of the Taj Mahal.

    Best wishes,

    MrP

    Not a professional ESL teacher.

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    #10

    Re: A problem with 'taking a photo'.

    Quote Originally Posted by MrPedantic View Post
    I wonder whether this structure would suit your context:

    1. He took Jim's picture for him.

    For instance, if I am a tourist, and I want you to take a picture of me in front of the Taj Mahal, I hand you my camera and ask you "to take my picture for me":

    2. I asked Yourek to take my picture for me in front of the Taj Mahal.

    Best wishes,

    MrP
    The first phrase is really elegant but I think that your very first suggestion was the most complete, because the latter should rather be
    ' He took Jane's picture for her and for himself'

    Best Regards
    Yourek

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