Results 1 to 6 of 6
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Czech
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Sep 2006
    • Posts: 262
    #1

    although a very simple question, I have trouble with that

    hi there,

    trying to analyze a sentence of such a structure.

    Dancing in the rain and singing in the dark.

    How many clauses are there? What do we call this sentence?


    thanks

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Czech
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Sep 2006
    • Posts: 262
    #2

    Re: although a very simple question, I have trouble with that

    sorry i was thinking, the answer is quite clear:

    it is a minor sentence consisting of two non-finite clauses connected with a coordinating conjunction (and).

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 1,517
    #3

    Re: although a very simple question, I have trouble with that

    Quote Originally Posted by jirikoo View Post
    hi there,

    trying to analyze a sentence of such a structure.

    Dancing in the rain and singing in the dark.

    How many clauses are there? What do we call this sentence?


    thanks
    A clause, by definition, has at least one subject and one verb.
    In your sentence there is no subject.
    "Dancing in the rain."
    If you consider 'dancing' as a noun, there is no verb.
    If you consider 'dancing' as an inflected verb, who is dancing? There is no subject.

    To have one simple clause, you could change it, for instance, to:
    They were dancing in the rain and singing in the dark.


    PS Not a native speaker

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Czech
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Sep 2006
    • Posts: 262
    #4

    Re: although a very simple question, I have trouble with that

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    A clause, by definition, has at least one subject and one verb.
    In your sentence there is no subject.
    "Dancing in the rain."
    If you consider 'dancing' as a noun, there is no verb.
    If you consider 'dancing' as an inflected verb, who is dancing? There is no subject.

    To have one simple clause, you could change it, for instance, to:
    They were dancing in the rain and singing in the dark.


    PS Not a native speaker

    nowadays, in modern linguistics we have got also non-finite clauses such as infinitives, gerunds and participles. They are right those that regarded as verbals (verbs as verbal phrases) and if used separably (not along with a finite clause), the sentence is called a "minor sentence".

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 1,517
    #5

    Re: although a very simple question, I have trouble with that

    Quote Originally Posted by jirikoo View Post
    nowadays, in modern linguistics we have got also non-finite clauses such as infinitives, gerunds and participles. They are right those that regarded as verbals (verbs as verbal phrases) and if used separably (not along with a finite clause), the sentence is called a "minor sentence".
    Thanks for the explanation.
    So, this is not exactly a clause, but a non-finite clause, right?

    You mean the traditional subject+verb clauses are called finite clauses, while you may have other non-finite clauses?

    Could you give some other examples of non-finite clauses?

    Are there written/spoken stuff wich cannot be classified neither as finite nor as non-finite clauses?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Czech
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Sep 2006
    • Posts: 262
    #6

    Re: although a very simple question, I have trouble with that

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    Thanks for the explanation.
    So, this is not exactly a clause, but a non-finite clause, right?

    You mean the traditional subject+verb clauses are called finite clauses, while you may have other non-finite clauses?

    Could you give some other examples of non-finite clauses?

    Are there written/spoken stuff wich cannot be classified neither as finite nor as non-finite clauses?

    you are right, in the traditional linguistics only the clauses that bear subject and predicate can be called a clause (finite). Modern linguists, though, incline to non-finite clause being widely used and classified as a clause, hence the non-finite clause.

    There are three divisions and some farther subdivisions of non-finite clauses, which are sometimes called verbals or verbal phrases / clauses:

    infinitives acting as adverbs, adjectives or nouns (eg. to walk)
    gerunds acting as nouns (e.g.running)
    participles acting as adjective (eg. acting as above)

    hope this helps

Similar Threads

  1. Simple Present: Easy question
    By Nightmare85 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Aug-2009, 14:49
  2. [Grammar] Totally lost - Past simple
    By engpoem in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-Oct-2008, 06:41
  3. [Grammar] Simple question about times
    By Jedrzej in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 23-Sep-2008, 09:47
  4. a simple question
    By NearThere in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 13-Apr-2008, 01:15
  5. have/has :/ simple question
    By square4 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 15-May-2007, 20:23

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •