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    #1

    The case of "nor"

    Most high school grammar books and dictionaries simply say that "nor" is a conjunction. But some university-level authorities say it is often an adverb that focuses on some word in the sentence. Take this example: Tom does not like mushrooms. Nor does Mona (like mushrooms). IF you are one of those who assert that "nor" is, indeed, an adverb in this example, then (1) What is the underlying conjunction? (2) Which word does "nor" focus on or "modify"? Thank you very much.


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    #2

    Re: The case of "nor"

    My brain is not in a state to give you a detailed explanation now, The Parser. Just one comment:
    Tom does not like mushrooms and nor does Mona.
    nor = A
    and = coordinating conj.

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    #3

    Re: The case of "nor"

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    Most high school grammar books and dictionaries simply say that "nor" is a conjunction. But some university-level authorities say it is often an adverb that focuses on some word in the sentence. Take this example: Tom does not like mushrooms. Nor does Mona (like mushrooms). IF you are one of those who assert that "nor" is, indeed, an adverb in this example, then (1) What is the underlying conjunction? (2) Which word does "nor" focus on or "modify"? Thank you very much.

    you have to decide what function the sentence element represents

    Adverbs usually modify an adjective, verb or another adverb.

    Tom does not like mushrooms. Nor does Mona (like mushrooms).

    Nor in this context is simply a coordinating conjunction connecting the two sentences of the same importance together. By no means it's an adverb.

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    #4

    Re: The case of "nor"

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    My brain is not in a state to give you a detailed explanation now, The Parser. Just one comment:
    Tom does not like mushrooms and nor does Mona.
    nor = A
    and = coordinating conj.
    Thanks so much for agreeing that "and" is the underlying conjunction. I look forward to hearing your views on "nor" as an adverb -- especially as to what word it "modifies." I'm guessing/ hoping it's "Mona." (Nice icon)

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    #5

    Re: The case of "nor"

    Quote Originally Posted by jirikoo View Post
    you have to decide what function the sentence element represents

    Adverbs usually modify an adjective, verb or another adverb.

    Tom does not like mushrooms. Nor does Mona (like mushrooms).

    Nor in this context is simply a coordinating conjunction connecting the two sentences of the same importance together. By no means it's an adverb.
    Thank you so much for answering my question. It was very kind of you.


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    #6

    Re: The case of "nor"

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    especially as to what word it "modifies." I'm guessing/ hoping it's "Mona." (Nice icon)
    Bad boy. What part of speech is 'Mona'? It is a proper noun. What do adverbs modify? Nouns?

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    #7

    Re: The case of "nor"

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    Bad boy. What part of speech is 'Mona'? It is a proper noun. What do adverbs modify? Nouns?
    Thanks for your reply. Consider: "Neither Tom nor Mona likes mushrooms." I guess we can all agree that "nor" does "focus" on "Mona." So in "Tom does not like mushrooms. Nor does Mona (like mushrooms)," is there the possibility that "nor" ( = also not) focuses on or "modifies" the word "Nora"? In very crude English, doesn't my sentence = Tom does not like mushrooms, and also not Mona does like mushrooms. Consider: Tom doesn't like mushrooms. Mona doesn't, either. I believe that "either" is modifying "Mona," not the verb. Thanks for any clarification.


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    #8

    Re: The case of "nor"

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    Thanks for your reply. Consider: "Neither Tom nor Mona likes mushrooms." I guess we can all agree that "nor" does "focus" on "Mona." So in "Tom does not like mushrooms. Nor does Mona (like mushrooms)," is there the possibility that "nor" ( = also not) focuses on or "modifies" the word "Nora"? In very crude English, doesn't my sentence = Tom does not like mushrooms, and also not Mona does like mushrooms. Consider: Tom doesn't like mushrooms. Mona doesn't, either. I believe that "either" is modifying "Mona," not the verb. Thanks for any clarification.
    A correlative conjunction, that is what neither ... nor is. It does not modify anything; what it does is make the subject compound by joining 'Nora' and 'Tom' together. What does 'and' modify in 'You and I, we love each other'? Nothing.

    Tom does not like mushrooms, and also not Mona does not like mushrooms.
    and = connector
    also = modifies 'not' (not = adverb)

    Mona doesn't, either.
    either = adverb (does not either), modifies 'not'

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    #9

    Re: The case of "nor"

    This may be completely irrelevant but, in Irish English one will often hear something like: "I don't like the cold weather" "No more do I" or some similar construction. I wonder, though I have absolutely no evidence for this, whether "nor" may sometimes be a contraction of "no more". "I don't like the cold weather" "Nor do I"; "I don't like the cold weather" "I don't like it any more than you (do)".

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    #10

    Re: The case of "nor"

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    A correlative conjunction, that is what neither ... nor is. It does not modify anything; what it does is make the subject compound by joining 'Nora' and 'Tom' together. What does 'and' modify in 'You and I, we love each other'? Nothing.



    and = connector
    also = modifies 'not' (not = adverb)



    either = adverb (does not either), modifies 'not'
    Thank you so much for answering my question and sharing your views.

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