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    #1

    which opinion is correct?

    Hi,

    Question:
    Some people gave me 2 completely different opinions about my sentences, which opinion is true?

    Opinion1:
    The "which" in sentence1 refers to only some of the speaker's numerate abilities, while the "which" in Sentence2 refers to all of his numerate abilities.

    Opinion2:
    Both sentences carry the same meaning.


    Sentence1:
    I want to further develop my numerate abilities which are important for an engineer.
    Sentence2:
    I want to further develop my numerate abilities, which are important for an engineer.

    Thanks

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    #2

    Re: which opinion is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by uktous View Post
    Hi,

    Question:
    Some people gave me 2 completely different opinions about my sentences, which opinion is true?

    Opinion1:
    The "which" in sentence1 refers to only some of the speaker's numerate abilities, while the "which" in Sentence2 refers to all of his numerate abilities.

    Opinion2:
    Both sentences carry the same meaning.


    Sentence1:
    I want to further develop my numerate abilities which are important for an engineer.
    Sentence2:
    I want to further develop my numerate abilities, which are important for an engineer.

    Thanks
    ***NOT A TEACHER***In my opinion, both sentences are "wrong." (1) I want to further develop THE numerate abilities THAT are important for an engineer. = I want to develop some numerate abilities. Which numerate abilities? The kind that an engineer needs. (2) I want to further develop my numerate abilities, which IS important for an engineer. = "Which" refers to the first part of the sentence. Don't forget the SUPER important comma in front of "which." What is important for an engineer? To further develop his/her numerate abilities.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: which opinion is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by uktous View Post
    Hi,

    Question:
    Some people gave me 2 completely different opinions about my sentences, which opinion is true?

    Opinion1:
    The "which" in sentence1 refers to only some of the speaker's numerate abilities, while the "which" in Sentence2 refers to all of his numerate abilities.

    Opinion2:
    Both sentences carry the same meaning.


    Sentence1:
    I want to further develop my numerate abilities which are important for an engineer.
    Sentence2:
    I want to further develop my numerate abilities, which are important for an engineer.

    Thanks
    Opinion 1 is correct. Without a comma, a 'which' clause is a defining clause - the clause defines which numerate abilities are being referred to.
    With a comma, a 'which' clause is non-defining. It adds additional information to the main clause.

    I don't see the problem with using 'my' in either type of 'which' clause.
    1. Here are my children which I love immensely. (As opposed to my other children, which I do not much care for).
    2. Here are my children, which I love immensely. (I love all my children immensely, and here they are).
    Last edited by Raymott; 10-Jan-2010 at 10:22.

  2. fighting spirit's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: which opinion is correct?

    Opinion 1 is correct. Without a comma, a 'which' clause is a defining clause - the clause defines which numerate abilities are being referred to.
    With a comma, a 'which' clause is non-defining. It adds additional information to the main clause.
    Absolutely
    I don't see the problem with using 'my' in either type of 'which' clause.
    It's not a problem, and it's not incorrect. But whenever it can be replaced with articles, do so.

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