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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Smile present participle & infinitive

    Dear teachers,

    1. I do not want my wife to go there.

    2. I do not want my wife earning more than me.

    I copied both of the sentences above from a dictionary.

    Can I rephrase the second sentence into the following:

    I do not want my wife to earn more than me.

    Could you give me some advice as to when to use -ing form instead of to-infinitive ?

    Your guidance is highly appreciated.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by kl004535; 10-Jan-2010 at 06:41.

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: present participle & infinitive

    Quote Originally Posted by kl004535 View Post
    Dear teachers,

    1. I do not want my wife to go there.

    2. I do not want my wife earning more than me.

    I copied both of the sentences above from a dictionary.

    Can I rephrase the second sentence into the following:

    I do not want my wife to earn more than me.

    Could you give me some advice as to when to use -ing form instead of to-infinitive ?

    Your guidance is highly appreciated.

    Thanks.
    There are some verbs which are preceded exclussively either by an inifitine or a gerund(ing form), some verbs can be by both without change of meaning while a fouth catagory accept both with a chang in meaning. To study the list of four catagories of verbs you can open this site: Gerunds and Infinitives ,Theory & Practice

    But here the inifinitive and the gerund are not directly preceding the verb but acting as direct object (noun function)with an indirect object. So you can see another site:
    Gerunds and Infinitives: Their Noun Roles
    Last edited by sarat_106; 10-Jan-2010 at 08:37.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
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    #3

    Re: present participle & infinitive

    Quote Originally Posted by kl004535 View Post

    2. I do not want my wife earning more than me.

    Can I rephrase the second sentence into the following:

    I do not want my wife to earn more than me.
    No. #2 means something else. It means you have more than one wife and you do not want the one who earns more money than you.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: present participle & infinitive

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    No. #2 means something else. It means you have more than one wife and you do not want the one who earns more money than you.
    It could mean that, but rarely does in practice.

  3. Junior Member
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 90
    #5

    Smile Re: present participle & infinitive

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    It could mean that, but rarely does in practice.

    I wonder if I can rephrase your statement into the sentence below.

    It can mean that, but rarely does in practice.

    what is the difference between yours and mine ?

    your guidance is highly appreciated.

    Thanks

  4. 1984law's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: present participle & infinitive

    Quote Originally Posted by kl004535 View Post
    Dear teachers,

    1. I do not want my wife to go there.

    2. I do not want my wife earning more than me.

    I copied both of the sentences above from a dictionary.

    Can I rephrase the second sentence into the following:

    I do not want my wife to earn more than me.

    Could you give me some advice as to when to use -ing form instead of to-infinitive ?

    Hi,
    Yes,both sentences 1 and 2 have exactly the same meaning.
    With some vrbs such as continue, like, love,hate,rember, forget, try, stop, you can use either infinitive or gerund, without making any difference.
    Your guidance is highly appreciated.

    Thanks.
    Hi,
    Yes,both sentences 1 and 2 have exactly the same meaning.
    With some vrbs such as continue, like, love,hate,rember, forget, try, stop, you can use either infinitive or gerund, without making any difference.
    Hope I have helped you.

  5. Junior Member
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 90
    #7

    Smile Re: present participle & infinitive

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    No. #2 means something else. It means you have more than one wife and you do not want the one who earns more money than you.
    I wonder how you interpret the sentence. Could you tell me your way of interpretation for the sentence ? This is what I want to learn.


    Thanks

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