Results 1 to 2 of 2
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #1

    simmer/set foot/skin-deep/in the swim/play safe

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    The kettle was kept on the simmer.

    keep on = continue, persist

    simmer (n) = temperature just below the boiling point, as in: "the stew remained at a simmer for hours"

    The kettle is simmering on the stove.

    simmer (v) = to boil gently, or with a gentle hissing

    Congress simmered with plans to reduce expenditure.

    Ideas were simmering at the back of his mind.

    I simmered with indignation.

    He was simmering with anger.

    She would not let him set foot across her threshold.

    She told the boy not to set foot out of the house until he had finished supper.

    set foot = to step; walk; go

    Mary's friendliness with Joan is only skin-deep.

    Ralph crammed for the test and got a good grade, but his knowledge of the lesson is only skin-deep.

    skin-deep = only on the surface; not having any deep or honest meaning; not really or closely connected with what it seems to belong to

    Joe is a bred-in-the-bone horseman; he has been riding since he was six.

    bred in the bone = belonging to your nature or character, especially from early teaching or long habit; natural from belief or habit; believing deeply

    Jim found some college friends at the lake that summer, and soon was in the swim of things.

    Mary went to New York with introductions to writers and artists, and that winter she was quite in the swim.

    in the swim = doing the same things that other people are doing; following the fashion (as in business or social affairs); busy with what most people are doing; to be in a favored position; to be associated with others in active affairs; active in something, know what is going on

    He got tired as the game went on, and began to play safe.

    Tom didn't know what the other driver would do, so he played it safe and stopped his own car.

    play safe = to be very careful; accept small gains or none to avoid loss; avoid danger for the sake of safety

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Oriya
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 2,121
    #2

    Exclamation Re: simmer/set foot/skin-deep/in the swim/play safe

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?
    The kettle was kept on the simmer.

    keep on = continue, persist= to give your attention to what you are doing all the time
    You have to keep your eye on the ball in business.


    simmer (n) = temperature just below the boiling point, as in: "the stew remained at a simmer for hours"

    The kettle is simmering on the stove. Ok

    simmer (v) = to boil gently, or with a gentle hissing= To be in a state of gentle ferment

    Congress simmered with plans to reduce expenditure.

    Ideas were simmering at the back of his mind.

    I simmered with indignation.

    He was simmering with anger.
    simmer down=To become calm after excitement or anger.
    Please leave the matter to me now, I will do something when things have simmered down a bit.
    She would not let him set foot across her threshold.

    She told the boy not to set foot out of the house until he had finished supper.

    set foot = to step; walk; go

    Mary's friendliness with Joan is only skin-deep.

    Ralph crammed for the test and got a good grade, but his knowledge of the lesson is only skin-deep.

    skin-deep = only on the surface; not having any deep or honest meaning; not really or closely connected with what it seems to belong to Ok
    He studied the subject only skin-deep.
    Joe is a bred-in-the-bone horseman; he has been riding since he was six.

    bred in the bone = belonging to your nature or character, especially from early teaching or long habit; natural from belief or habit; believing deeply

    Jim found some college friends at the lake that summer, and soon was in the swim of things.

    Mary went to New York with introductions to writers and artists, and that winter she was quite in the swim.

    in the swim = doing the same things that other people are doing; following the fashion (as in business or social affairs); busy with what most people are doing; to be in a favored position; to be associated with others in active affairs; active in something, know what is going on =(figurative) involved in or participating in events or happenings
    You may still get confused, even when you're in the swim of things

    He got tired as the game went on, and began to play safe.

    Tom didn't know what the other driver would do, so he played it safe and stopped his own car.

    play safe = to be very careful; accept small gains or none to avoid loss; avoid danger for the sake of safety

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    All are fine. “Play safe and be safe” is a sound advice applicable to every walk of life
    Last edited by sarat_106; 14-Jan-2010 at 17:00.

Similar Threads

  1. drive "slow" or drive "slowly": the diff
    By infinikyte in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 28-Dec-2003, 18:15

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •