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  1. Tinkerbell's Avatar
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    #1

    took the train up

    he took the train up to New York

    he got on new york train or

    he booked tickets for new york train or

    he arrived to new york (by train)?

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    #2

    Re: took the train up

    Quote Originally Posted by Tinkerbell View Post
    he took the train up to New York

    he got on new york train or

    he booked tickets for new york train or

    he arrived to new york (by train)?
    ***NOT A TEACHER***(1) He took the train (up) (down) to New York City. (2) He got on the New York train. (3) He booked (bought) tickets for the New York train. (4) He arrived in New York City by train.

  2. Tinkerbell's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: took the train up

    I want to ask that what does took the train up in that sentence? a,b or c?

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: took the train up

    The closest is C, but your version is not grammatical. Parser's rewrite of the third one is your choice.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: took the train up

    "He took the train up to New York" means that he has already travelled by train, and has already arrived in New York by that mode of transport.

    To take the train is more American English. In British English we would generally say "to get the train".

    And "up" and "down" are regularly used when referring to travel, usually depending on which direction someone is going. I would say "up" if travelling north, and "down" if travelling south.

  5. kfredson's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: took the train up

    Quote Originally Posted by Tinkerbell View Post
    he took the train up to New York

    he got on new york train or

    he booked tickets for new york train or

    he arrived to new york (by train)?
    The third one is the closest, but the sentence really means:

    He got on a train south of New York and rode it north into the city (or state.)

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