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    • Join Date: Jan 2010
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    #1

    need help

    What does "You try to move a comma, but the Israelis or Palestinians move a semicolon to block your comma," mean?

    I read it in an article which appeared in the Time magazine a couple of weeks ago titled "the state of hillary". This part was about Israelis and Palestinians. I guess the general meaning is that Israelis or Palestinians are creating obstacles, but I want to know whhat comma and semicolon mean here and why they are used, what do they refer to? I would be grateful if you could help.

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    #2

    Re: need help

    Quote Originally Posted by y.behrooz View Post
    What does "You try to move a comma, but the Israelis or Palestinians move a semicolon to block your comma," mean?

    I read it in an article which appeared in the Time magazine a couple of weeks ago titled "the state of hillary". This part was about Israelis and Palestinians. I guess the general meaning is that Israelis or Palestinians are creating obstacles, but I want to know whhat comma and semicolon mean here and why they are used, what do they refer to? I would be grateful if you could help.
    ***NOT A TEACHER***What a great question. I, too, am eager to see what other posters say. Here is my humble contribution: (1) It reminds me of a saying that goes something like: Never put a period where Life has put a comma. In other words, when things go badly, don't accept it as final (period or full stop). The problem may only be a temporary pause in your life (comma). (2) Now, a semicolon is between a comma and a period. (Some teachers tell their students a semicolon is a "super comma.") (3) So maybe (maybe) that sentence means something like: Every time we make some progress in the negotiations, one of the two parties does not say an outright "NO," but does raise objections with "however," "nevertheless," "otherwise," etc. In English, those three words and others often have a SEMICOLON in front of them. Yes, we agree; however, we do not like....

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: need help

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***NOT A TEACHER***What a great question. I, too, am eager to see what other posters say. Here is my humble contribution: (1) It reminds me of a saying that goes something like: Never put a period where Life has put a comma. In other words, when things go badly, don't accept it as final (period or full stop). The problem may only be a temporary pause in your life (comma). (2) Now, a semicolon is between a comma and a period. (Some teachers tell their students a semicolon is a "super comma.") (3) So maybe (maybe) that sentence means something like: Every time we make some progress in the negotiations, one of the two parties does not say an outright "NO," but does raise objections with "however," "nevertheless," "otherwise," etc. In English, those three words and others often have a SEMICOLON in front of them. Yes, we agree; however, we do not like....
    I do wish you would stop being so "humble" you remind me of Uriah Heep.

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