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    • Join Date: Mar 2009
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    #1

    Who's the breadwinner?

    Dear teachers,
    Could you check these two sentences? I have a problem with uncountable nouns:) and articles.

    I eat country bread and not (the) dark one.

    I eat bread made in Paris and not (the) country one.

    I'll be really grateful for your kind help.
    Thank you in advance.

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    #2

    Re: Who's the breadwinner?

    Hello CE,

    As you suspected, "one" doesn't quite work with "bread". You might use "kind" or "sort" or "type".

    1. I like X from Y, not the dark kind/sort.

    Or you can omit the pronoun, rearrange the sentence, or repeat the noun:

    2. I like French cheese, not English.
    3. I like French, not English, cheese.
    4. I like French cheese, not English cheese.

    I wonder too whether "country bread" (which is not a common combination in English) is a translation of "pain de campagne".

    If so, "farmhouse loaf" might be better as a general translation; though that won't work in your examples!

    Best wishes,

    MrP

    Not a professional ESL teacher.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Who's the breadwinner?

    Quote Originally Posted by MrPedantic View Post
    ...
    I wonder too whether "country bread" (which is not a common combination in English) is a translation of "pain de campagne".

    If so, "farmhouse loaf" might be better as a general translation; though that won't work in your examples!

    Best wishes,

    MrP
    Well spotted

    Incidentally, I don't know whether the subject-line is a joke or whether someone thinks that 'breadwinner' means 'winner among sorts of bread' - which it doesn't. A 'breadwinner' is whoever earns the money to support a family: Examples: 'I am the breadwinner', 'In modern couples neither partner is the sole breadwinner', 'My wife is the breadwinner'.


    b


    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 127
    #4

    Re: Who's the breadwinner?

    I know who is the breadwinner, I just wanted to make the title provocative or catchy or ... I just like such wordplay. Anyway, thank you for your comment, I'll be more literal next time:) Don't think I'm stupid


    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 127
    #5

    Re: Who's the breadwinner?

    Quote Originally Posted by MrPedantic View Post
    Hello CE,

    As you suspected, "one" doesn't quite work with "bread". You might use "kind" or "sort" or "type".

    1. I like X from Y, not the dark kind/sort.

    Or you can omit the pronoun, rearrange the sentence, or repeat the noun:

    2. I like French cheese, not English.
    3. I like French, not English, cheese.
    4. I like French cheese, not English cheese.

    I wonder too whether "country bread" (which is not a common combination in English) is a translation of "pain de campagne".

    If so, "farmhouse loaf" might be better as a general translation; though that won't work in your examples!

    Best wishes,

    MrP

    Thank you:) It isn't a translation, I just googled it and found such expression. I'll better use this 'country'. Thank you for your help as far as articles and the like are concerned.

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